Galati Yacht Sales
Texas Outlaw Challenge
Quantum Sails
Sea Lake Yachts
South Texas Yacht Service
Texas Sportfishing Yacht Sales
Marina Del Sol
Seabrook Marina
Tookie's Seafood
The Fishing Boat Club

La Izquierda Surf and Music Festival

April 23rd, 2018

La Izquierda is a surf and music festival dedicated to enriching and uniting communities of Galveston, the Gulf Coast and beyond through a good old fashioned surf competition and Fun-raiser for the Surfrider Foundation. And of course there has to be music.

Local and touring bands and artists come from near and far to celebrate surf culture and the preservation of our natural waters and beach habitat with groovy tunes.

There’s also a beer competition. Artisan beers will be available for the price of one beer-one purchased ticket and at the end of the day, the brewery with the most ale donated, wins the prize. (Go GIB)

There is an 8 am highly encouraged free surf and coffee session sponsored by Galveston Coffee Roasters with yoga going on by the beach. Live Music and surf competitions ($30 entrance fee) go from Ten to Ten (am/pm). Prizes include cool artwork, gear and an all inclusive world class Surf Getaway.

For information and the line-up as it appears visit, please visit our website at www.laizquierdafest.com. We also encourage everyone to like and share the facebook page, La Izquierda Surf and Music Festival. For inquiries about getting involved or non-profit sponsorship opportunities contact robert at robertkuhnmusic@gmail.com.

Flier 1.0 La Izquierda Surf and Music Festival

Haynie Custom Bay Boats – 25′ Magnum

March 5th, 2018

 Haynie Custom Bay Boats   25 Magnum

haynie fd789218dbb4e21f7267ca50532332aa59d509521a94b31e82195d7d4c639a54 300x173 Haynie Custom Bay Boats   25 MagnumWith hundreds of miles of Texas coast line, Haynie custom bay boats can cover it all. From the open waters that can kick up a healthy chop on the Galveston Bay complex to the flats of Rockport, you won’t find a more superior ride. The 25 Magnum is the newest addition to the Haynie line-up and it is a monster.

The Magnum handles extremely well in choppy conditions. The hull is 24’ 11” long and has an 8’ 3” beam. This V-hull will draft in 10” of water, get up in 16-18” of water, and will run in 6-8” of water. With a 250-hp Mercury® Pro XS®, this boat will run between 55-60 mph. With a 350-hp Mercury® Verado®, it will run 65-70 mph depending on the deck layout and rigging.

All Haynie boats come on a custom aluminum Coastline Trailer built in Seadrift, Texas. Each trailer is built for your boat and comes standard with L.E.D. lights and smooth riding torsion axles.

Located in Aransas Pass, Chris’s Marine is a family owned full service marine dealership and the largest Haynie boat dealer. Stop by and visit the nice folks at Chris’s Marine and let them help you design your perfect fishing boat. The options are endless!

CHRIS’S MARINE:
1213 W. Wheeler Ave
Aransas Pass, Texas
361-758-8486
www.hayniebayboats.com
www.chrismarineboats.com

Tight Budget? How to get the most out of your current sails

March 1st, 2018

Tight Budget Image Tight Budget? How to get the most out of your current sails

Part of managing a sailing program of any kind–be it cruising or racing–is balancing the budget. From deck hardware to bottom paint and sails, something always needs replacing or fixing. Luckily when it comes to sails, there are a few inexpensive things you can do to help you extend that budget a little further.

1. GET YOUR SAILS INSPECTED

Sail inspections can bring to light not only torn stitches or tired webbing, but also use issues that may be causing damage to your sail. For example, broken stitching on the luff of the sail could indicate too much halyard tension or dimples in your spinnaker could be the result of crew pulling it down by grasping the middle of the sail instead of using the tapes.

Annual inspections should be part of every program with the goal of maximizing the life of the sail. Catching and fixing a few small problems (especially if the sail is older) can also prevent catastrophic failure on the water.

2. RECUT YOUR SAILS EVERY FEW YEARS

All sails stretch and lose shape over time and through use. If you’re experiencing the tell-tale signs of stretched sails–an inability to point, difficulty steering, or lack of power under sail–it doesn’t necessarily mean you need new sails. Many sailors don’t realize sails can be recut to bring back up to 90 percent of their original shape and extend their life at a fraction of the cost of new ones. Typically, one or two recuts can be done over the life of a sail. Recutting sails has been a common practice for pro programs for years, sometimes adjusting and recutting sails between race days.

You’ll want a handful of good sail shape photos to take to the loft along with your sail. And bonus points if you take photos of your sails on an annual basis! Click here to learn how to get the best shots and start your recordkeeping. If you’re curious about the recut process and benefits, click here for an article to shed some light on what you need to know about recuts.

3. HAVE YOUR SAILS PROFESSIONALLY REPAIRED

You might have saved the day with your quick fix when the spinnaker caught on a turnbuckle and started to rip, but did you remember to take it to the loft for a proper repair afterward? Onboard sail repairs are great when you need to finish the sail and get back to the dock safely, but they’re not meant to be a permanent fix. You’d be surprised how easy it is to forget you have a few strips of duct tape holding part of your sail together when it’s packed out of sight and out of mind. As you can guess, ignoring damage will not end well for the sail or your budget.

4. CHECK YOUR RIG TUNE

If your rig tune is out of whack, it can significantly affect sail performance. Before you throw in the towel with your current sails, check to make sure the issue isn’t your rig. Have an expert sail with you to see what adjustments might remedy the problem. This is especially important for cruisers who don’t regularly tune their rigs for conditions the way a race program might. We have more information on that here.

5. CONSIDER SAIL ADD-ONS

There are a number of sail add-ons and updates that can help improve functionality and extend their lifespan. Reefing points, UV covers, and spreader patches are all on the list. Talk to your sailmaker about what modifications can be made to help the sail work better and make it usable for a few more years.

6. LOOK BEYOND THE SAIL

It is important to look at the health and setup of your boat’s entire system in order to get the most out of your sails. Not all systems are created equally, and having the right sail handling system for your needs will help reduce stress on the sails. Roller furlers are great for easily and smoothly using your headsail, especially if you have a novice crew or sail shorthanded. Mainsail handling systems, such as the Dutchman and an in-mast or boom furling system, can also come in handy and help to reduce wear-and-tear on your sail.

Of course, the right system needs to be in good shape. If the sail handling system is failing, you’re at risk of damaging your sail. Similarly, sun-rotted lines or finicky winches pose threats to sails under load, as do sticky tracks and tired blocks. Invite your sailmaker or local rep to your boat for help identifying problem areas or to discuss options for improving your sail handling systems.

You shouldn’t give up on your trusty sails just because you’re starting to experience performance issues or they’re getting older. Call your sailmaker and explore a few of these ideas before you open your checkbook to pay for a new set. If you decide a new set is the right solution, use this information and the expertise of your sailmaker to ensure your sails are setup properly and you’re using best practices and sail care services to maximize their lifespan and protect your investment.

_______

Contact Quantum Sails Gulf Coast at gulfcoast@quantumsails.com or 281-474-4168 to learn more about getting the most out of your sails. You can also visit QuantumSails.com for more great tips and tricks to help you meet all of your sailing challenges.

Gear Up For Spring

February 28th, 2018

pfg board short Gear Up For Spring

Columbia PFG Offshore Camo Fade Boardshort

Combining good looks and high-performance, these Columbia boardshorts cover all the bases. The Omni-Wick and Omni-Shade UPF 50 fabric protects from the sun and dries quickly. Stash your keys or extra tackle in a zippered cargo pocket. These boardshorts even have a bottle opener for those celebrations on the dock or beach. Available in five digital fade colors. Shown in Cedar Redfish Digi Fade Print.

www.columbia.com

salty crew hat Gear Up For Spring

Salty Crew Mahi Trucker Hat

Choose to keep it salty with this Salty Crew trucker hat. Features a mesh back and nylon ‘dorado’ patch sewn to the front.

www.salty-crew.com

Columbia Men’s Dorado CVO PFG Shoe

This versatile shoe combines a comfortable wear-anywhere design and high-performance pedigree. Super-plush and quick-drying, the Dorado CVO PFG is built for the life aquatic with a breathable mesh upper, superior midsole cushioning, and wet grip traction. Plus, advanced water and stain repellency helps ensure a clean look whether you’re dockside or downtown. Shown in Zour/Emerald Sea

www.columbia.com

Yo-Zuri 3D Inshore Twitchbait

This slow sinking lipless hard bait by Yo-Zuri exhibits an erratic darting action during a twitch and pause retrieve. Use the smaller 2 3/4” size in Ghost Shad to imitate an injured glass minnow when fishing the lights at night this spring.

www.yo-zuri.com

Yo-Zuri 3DR Minnow

Small Yo-Zuri jerkbaits have long been a secret weapon for targeting redfish and trout around nighttime light sources. New for 2018, the 2 3/4 3DR Minnow in Real Glass Minnow is a perfect forage imitation to use around causeway or canal lights.

www.yo-zuri.com

Strike King Redfish Magic Spinnerbait

Spring means high winds, high tides and murky water in the marsh. Search out hungry redfish with the extra vibration and flash from this proven Strike King spinnerbait. Shown in Black Neon Chartreuse. Available in 1/8 or 1/4 oz sizes.

www.strikeking.com

FishStix “Kitchen Sink”

The FishStix “Kitchen Sink,”  7’ Medium bait cast rod is built for throwing a little bit of everything. It has enough backbone and power to throw heavier baits such as topwaters, popping corks, live bait and crankbaits but still has a fast enough tip to be able to throw tails. It’s the perfect rod for beginners, everyday anglers, and guides because of its great versatility and dependability.

“Kitchen Sink”

Length/Action: 7’ Medium

Line: 10 – 20 LBS

Lure: 3/8 -1 Oz.

Micro guides

Fuji SK2 Split Reel Seat

www.gotfishstix.com

13 Fishing Concept Z Baitcasting Reel

13 Fishing is exploring the future of fishing reels with the first high performance baitcasting reel that uses zero ball bearings. The result is a quiet and far-reaching cast that won’t suffer performance loss from debris, corrosion or environmental wear. A ridiculous 22 pounds of max drag keeps even the biggest fish in check.

Weight: 6.4 oz., Line Capacity: 12/135, Ratio: 6.6:1, 7.3:1 or 8.1:1

www.13fishing.com

Wilderness Systems Ride 135

What you can see is what you catch when sight fishing for marsh redfish. This time-tested Wilderness Systems yak is stable enough for any angler to stand up in and gain a better vantage point. The 13”6’ length will keep you paddling happy vs. shorter kayaks. Shown in Mango.

www.wildernesssystems.com

 

Galati Yacht Sales: A Name You Can Trust

February 28th, 2018

galati houston Galati Yacht Sales: A Name You Can Trust

Galati Yacht Sales Texas Manager Jay Dee Jackson continues a family-owned tradition of excellence

annamaria Galati Yacht Sales: A Name You Can Trust

Galati’s first location at Anna Maria opened in 1970.

Galati Yacht Sales, a once storm ravaged Florida marina, is now a No. 1 dealership with locations in the USA, Mexico and Costa Rica. The company’s humble beginnings start with Jay Dee Jackson’s grandfather, Michael Galati Sr. in 1970.  He moved his family of seven from New York down to Anna Maria Island, Florida.

“He felt drawn to Anna Maria, as this is the name of my grandmother. He saw this as a sign and decided to purchase a marina there that had just been devastated by a storm,” said Jay Dee. “From there, he and his wife, Anna Maria, and their five children worked to rebuild the marina and grew the company to what is now Galati Yacht Sales.”

Galati now has ten locations in three countries and carries some of the world’s finest yachts, including Maritimo, Viking, Prestige, Princess and Cruisers Yachts. They offer new, pre-owned and brokerage yacht sales with the ability to accept trade-ins on new or pre-owned purchases. Their Texas location is just off 45 south on Offatt’s Bayou in Galveston.

Join the Family

Galati Yacht Sales differentiates itself from the competition with a business philosophy that this family-owned company has lived by since inception. The third generation now leads the company and the principle remains the same; a passion and love for the industry in everything they do.

Their mission statement “Consistently Exceeding The Expectations Of Our Customers,” means clients are treated like family. Michael Galati Sr. was known to say that “Our customers are always there for us, so in turn, we will always be there for our customers. We must stick together as a family, work hard and earn our customers business.”

This work ethic has not gone unnoticed. Galati has been recognized in the boating industry in more ways than one. They recently earned No.1 dealer in Boating Industry’s Top 100 Dealers Award. They have won multiple times since 2007 and have now been entered into the Boating Industry Hall of Fame.

Every Step of the Way

Galati is there for its customers and can assist for every step of a yacht purchase — an exciting process than can be a little stressful for some. Years of experience and in-house financing makes for a one-stop yacht shop. Whether you are a new boater, or an old salt, Team Galati strives to make your experience one to remember and enjoy for years.

The relationship with the Galati family does not end after your new vessel is purchased, that is just the beginning. They are always available to customers for anything they need along their boating journey. From hosting boating trips to our endless service technician support, they are happy to put in the work to help you have a more enjoyable experience on the water. For whatever your needs may be, Galati is a name you can trust.

A Team Like No Other

“Apart from our family, we have been extremely fortunate to build an incredible team over the years. Our Galveston location staff members and brokers are there to support our customers in every aspect and have led us to only build upon the values that we laid our foundation on,” said Jay Dee Jackson.

Jay Dee is the manager of the Galati Yacht Sales Texas location. “My wife, Alyssa and I moved to the area recently from Sarasota, Florida and I am a graduate of The University of Mississippi with a degree in Business Management,” said Jackson.

Larry Smith joined Team Galati 13 years ago and boasts 46 years of experience in the marine industry. “It is a pleasure being associated with a company that puts customer service at the top of their priorities!” said Smith.

David Hunt is a native of Seabrook and continues his life-long love of the water and a passion for boats. He is a third generation member of Lakewood Yacht Club and a past president of the Gulf Coast Yacht Brokers Association. “I pride myself on my honesty, attention to detail, and desire to always act in my client’s best interest. Our marketing can make sure that your yacht is exposed to buyers throughout the world,” said Hunt.

Cory Webster is a native Texan and has spent the past 17 years developing his expertise in the boating business. Over the years, Cory has been fortunate to represent some of the best boating and yachting brands. “Working side by side with the best of the best in manufacturing, dealers and salespeople in this industry gets me excited. Seeing their values, passion and innovation keeps our business going strong!” said Webster.

Jordan Butler was born and raised in Galveston. The son of a well-respected captain, he was exposed to both the sportfishing and boating scenes at an early age. “Boating and fishing has always been a huge part of my life. I will always have a lifelong passion for going offshore and being on the water,” said Butler.

Randy Bright is a native Texan and has held every position in the competitive marlin fishing world as an owner, captain, angler and cockpit/wire man. “I stay very involved with many of my clients through the Houston Big Game Fishing Club events and several Gulf Coast and international fishing tournaments. I enjoy the friendships that I develop before and after the sale and spend time fishing, boating and traveling with clients particularly to the Bahamas and Costa Rica,” said Bright.

Galati is a certified dealer for Viking Yacht Sales.

Start Your Adventure Now

The boating season is just around the corner. Get in touch with Galati and they’ll get you on course to owning the boat or yacht of your dreams. Visit them in person at 7819 Broadway St., Suite #100 Galveston, Texas 77554. Call them at (409) 741-8716 or view inventory online at galatiyachts.com. Find them on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @galatiyachtsales

Marsh Fishing in Spring

February 28th, 2018

redfish marsh fishing Marsh Fishing in Spring

Captain Clay Sheward hooked up to a redfish deep in the marsh.

By Capt. Steve Soule

www.ultimatedetailingllc.com

Spring may be the toughest season of all to figure out on the upper Texas Coast. It’s the first of our two annual transitional periods, and in my opinion, definitely the harder of the two to get a solid grasp on when it comes to patterning. With so many factors at play, March and April can wreck even the best made plans.

To gain a better understanding, we need to think first about where we are transitioning from. In a winter season like we’ve just had, the coldest in nearly 10 years, we truly put fish into a winter pattern. This is a pattern that can be predictable and reasonable easy to describe and understand. Fish tend to move slightly deeper and hold over certain types of structure or bay substrate. Food sources, though limited have become reliable and are somewhat easy to locate as they are larger and more visible than at other times of the year.

Temperature

At the first signs of spring, anglers can often do very well. Predatory fish move from deeper to shallower water as the air and water temperatures warm. The initial warming creates added temperature to the cold blooded fish as well as their prey. This change typically makes both more active and sends predators out in search of food. But this isn’t always the easiest thing for hungry predators to accomplish.

Everything is transient in spring; both predator and prey. Temperature and barometric pressure swings wildly during this period. Weather varies from mild to violent

and boating and fishing pressure is steadily increasing.

Wind, tide, temperature and timing; all of these factors play a major role in spring fishing. But the prevalence and types of available food for predators is still limited.

Spring Prey

Winter forage, like mullet and finfish are still present but the return, or emergence of other various food sources happens at a much slower pace than their departure during fall. Wintering crabs and shrimp that have buried in mud through the cooler months will be some of the earliest additions to the menu, followed by a slow trickle of various other small baitfish species. Keep in mind that this is a slow process that is triggered more so by the “photo period” or length of daylight versus darkness than it is by temperature. Many food sources don’t truly return in force until later in spring.

Wind

Wind is always a factor in spring, especially during the first half of the season. Light wind days are few and far between, and late season cold fronts can often push us well into the small craft advisory range. This doesn’t lend itself well to great fishing days and certainly doesn’t make spring inviting for anglers. With high winds come several other factors that influence fishing. High tides and rapid barometric pressure come to mind at the top of the list.

reds Marsh Fishing in Spring

Marcos Enriquez with a nice shallow water redfish.

High Tides

Discussions on high tides seem to happen repeatedly during spring. For those who fish open and deeper water areas, the significance is reduced dramatically. For those who fish relatively shallow waters, the impact is quite substantial.

Big rising tides push small prey animals deeper into marshes and other areas where they can find cover from predation. The host of predators, like redfish, trout and flounder, will follow. Often, this puts predator and prey out of reach of most boaters and increases the overall size of the area we have to search. Fish become like needles in a haystack.

It often seems like redfish enjoy exploring new territory, and high tides are the open invitation for them to take off wandering.

Pressure

The large swings in barometric pressure during spring can provide both good and bad fishing. Changes in pressure seem to create short windows of increased feeding activity, especially when they happen in conjunction with moving tides or a moon position that would already cause fish to hunt for food. We can’t fish purely around pressure changes, not predictably anyway. You can shoot for catching the big changes as fronts approach and pass the coastline, but safety and comfort are often compromised. More often than not, most of us as anglers are stuck with the days that we can get on the water. It’s interesting to note, that even small changes in the direction of barometric pressure movement can effect fish feeding behaviors. Steady pressure, or pressure that is steadily on the rise or fall, often yields stagnant fish feeding

Timing

Timing, as I mentioned earlier, can have a huge impact on our success rates in fishing. Knowing seasonal patterns is very helpful in understanding when fish tend to feed in certain areas. If you don’t have years of fishing log information, then you can only go and hope for the best in finding actively feeding fish or rely on local information. Often, springtime doesn’t follow the typical feeding periods normally associated with summer. Don’t be one of the anglers that hunt out a summer feeding pattern this early in the year.

Bottom line, springtime fishing requires more thought on average than any other season along the coast. Careful planning, understanding the conditions, researching or having years of experience can help greatly. Knowing the available food sources, and making appropriate adjustments in your lure arsenal can pay off with big dividends. Most of the new arrivals of prey animals are quite small, which often leads to day where even larger predatory species are focused on eating small but numerous meals.

With careful planning, and an educated approach, spring can pay big dividends of big trout. But, if you think that you’re going to find a summer pattern just because of the rapid warm up, you will be in for quite the surprise.

Get out and enjoy the warmer weather, and don’t be discouraged by the difficulties. Instead, use the time wisely to cover more water and seek out the patterns hidden within the season.

Fishing After a Cold Winter

February 28th, 2018

max conner trout Fishing After a Cold Winter

Max Conner with a solid stringer of trout and reds.

What will the effects of our icy winter have on fishing?

By Capt. Joe Kent

Beginning in mid-December, the Galveston Bay Complex experienced one of its coldest winters in years.  Many of the anglers have not been through a severe winter from an historical perspective. You have to go back into the 1990s to find when we had subfreezing temperatures along the Texas Coast that lasted more than a short time.

Severe cold is not anything new to the Galveston Bay Complex; however, the number of days of subfreezing conditions has progressively dropped over the last decade.

A frequently asked question by readers of the Galveston County Daily News is how will all of the bitter cold weather affect fishing during 2018?

The answer is that it is hard to pinpoint; however, there are several indicators that tell us that when the weather warms, normal fishing patterns should return.

In the good news department, it appears that there were no major fish kills during the multiple freeze events that took place.  While fish kills were reported, most of the finfish were forage fish, mainly mullet, menhaden and small fish of all species that were not large enough to tolerate water in the 40 degree range very long.

One of the reasons the stocks of gamefish survived well is that they had time to get acclimated to the cold and had moved into areas offering deep, protected waters.

Last January, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department exercised its right to close certain bodies of water when freeze events took place.  This is the first time the TPWD has exercised that option and the areas around the Galveston Bay Complex that were affected were Moses Lake in the vicinity of the flood gates and most of Offatts Bayou.

Both areas are known to hold large concentrations of trout and other fish when the water temperatures fall into the low 40s or lower.  In those pockets of deep water, fish are sluggish and easy prey for anglers.

Shortly after one of the freeze events in the early 1960s,  I fished with a friend at the Blue Hole in Offatts Bayou and recall catching close to 50 trout (there were no size nor bag limits back then) with many of the fish being snagged by the treble hooks on my Bingo Lure.

In the bad news department, the freeze took its toll on aquatic vegetation.  There is little doubt that the plants will rebound; however, it could take a while after this long winter.  Like with all other vegetation, warm weather is the key to rebounding and growth.

The effect of the loss of aquatic plants is in the loss of cover for fish, mainly young fin fish, crustaceans and shell fish.

Over the past 10 to 20 years when mild winters were the norm, we started the spring season with a good crop of bait in the marshes and wetlands.  It remains to be seen just how badly the freezes affected that part of the marine life cycle.

Overall, I expect 2018 to be a good year for fishing, barring any catastrophic events such as major floods or droughts.

While not on the topic of fishing directly, one of the big effects of a long cold winter is on boats, especially engines and mechanical equipment.  A large number of boats have not been run for many weeks and problems likely are going to be widespread, with contaminated fuel, frozen water lines and other parts that are vulnerable to freezing weather or sitting up very long.

Before using your boat for the first time this year, check it out. For the first trip away from the dock, make it an abbreviated one and do not venture too far.

Galveston Bay Spring Fishing

February 28th, 2018

sheephead Galveston Bay Spring Fishing

Phoung Nguyen with a nice sheepshead

Come On Spring!

By Capt. David C. Dillman

Spec-tacular Trout Adventures832-228-8012

always wonder how the folks up  “North” survive the winter. After these cold, cold months all I can say is “I have had enough!”

This is the first real winter in many years for “us” on the Upper Coast of Texas. The wintery mix of snow and ice was a novelty, but worrisome for those of us that enjoy the fishery of Galveston Bay. We dodged a major fish kill disaster from a devastating freeze. I think we are all ready for some sunshine and warmer temperatures. Come on spring!

This coming March and April we should experience a traditional spring fishing pattern in the Galveston Bay Complex. The traditional “drum run” will be in full swing along the Galveston Jetties. Also plenty of sheepshead, along with redfish and speckled trout will prowl the rocks. Depending on how fast the water temperature rises, these fish should make their way into lower Galveston Bay, at the end of the month.

In April, while the “drum run” is still happening, many anglers will set their “radar” on speckled trout. This winter, trout fishing was decent. It will improve significantly this month! Late season cold fronts this month can bring moderate to strong winds prior to their arrival. These winds are usually from the south-southeast. East Galveston Bay and the waters north of the Texas City Dike offer protection from the winds. Every incoming tide will push trout into these areas this month. In East Bay, Sievers Cut to Stingaree Cut and the adjacent reefs are the “go to” places. On the West side, Mosquito Island to Dollar Point offers plenty of protection and areas to fish under strong south winds. The shoreline in front of the floodgate at Moses Lake, is a good springtime spot to catch speckled trout.

Live shrimp supplies should be good, but I would call a bait camp ahead of your planned trip. In the Clear Lake – Kemah area, check with Eagle Point Fishing Camp at 281-339-1131. Eagle Point offers quick access to the above mentioned areas and is a full service marina with a boat launch. Enjoy this upcoming Spring weather. See ya on the water!

EuroSport Marine

February 28th, 2018

euro zar EuroSport Marine

ZAR Formenti 85SL

Your Yachting Lifestyle Company in Texas

EuroSport Marine is all about supporting the yachting lifestyle.  They import ZAR Formenti Rigid Inflatable Boats (RIB’s) from Italy.

The ZAR Mini line is a rugged aluminum boat that is lightweight and practical.  Coach boats, fishing boats, lightweight tenders, and other uses make this a cost-effective solution for many.  This boat is like the ‘standard’ RIB most people think about where the tubes are wrapped around the hull.  There are many center console options and can be easily customized to fit a broad range of uses.

The ZAR ZF is the ZAR Formenti high end tender line that ranges in size from 10 ft to 15 ft in one-foot increments.  The ZF series has all the features of the ZAR Sport Boat line, in a more compact package.  It allows a yacht owner to dial in exactly the size of boat to fit a particular swim platform or davit.

The ZAR Formenti Sport Boat line is the top of the line RIB made anywhere.  Along with the ZF line, the sport boats are all hand made in a small village in Italy outside Milan.  These stunning boats are unlike any other RIB on the market, and are a must see.

See all these boats in EuroSport’s showroom located at 804 Anders Lane in Kemah.  Give them a call at 1-832-308-0190 anytime or stop by and visit them.

Crawfish for the Win!

February 28th, 2018

Tis the season for mudbugs! Crawfish are plentiful and besides heading out to your favorite fresh fish market for the little crawlers or restaurant for a well seasoned boil by the pound, you can enjoy recipes with your leftovers or buy bags of frozen pre-cooked crawfish meat. It’s all good.

You can sometimes find more healthful versions of the following recipes. However, full disclosure here, these all include calorie happy ingredients, and the taste is worth the splurge.

crawfishsolo Crawfish for the Win!

Jalapeño Crawfish Dip

  • 1/2 stick butter
  • 2 cups of mixed and chopped onion, celery and green bell pepper
  • 1/4 to 1/3 jalapeño, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups of boiled crawfish tails
  • 1 8 ounce package of cream cheese
  • 1/2 Tablespoon Tony Chachere’s Creole seasoning
  • salt and pepper to taste.

Heat butter on medium heat in a medium pan. Add chopped veggies, jalapeño and cook until onions are translucent. Add minced garlic and continue to stir.

Add crawfish tails and stir, until warm. Add cream cheese to the mixture and stir until melted. Add salt, pepper and Creole seasoning. May be served hot or cold on small baguette slices or bagel chips.

crawfish pasta recipe Crawfish for the Win!

Debbie’s Crawfish Fettuccine

  • 1/2 stick of butter
  • 10 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 cups of sliced mushrooms
  • 1 lb. cooked Louisiana crawfish tails
  • 1 squeezed lemon
  • 2 teaspoons Tony Chachere’s Creole seasoning
  • 2 Tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 pint heavy cream
  • Cooked pasta for 4 servings.

Saute: butter, garlic and mushrooms.

Add: crawfish, lemon, seasoning, and flour.

Add cream last and cook till done.  Serve over fettuccine or farfalle.

Pair with white wines such as Riesling or Albariño.

Debbie’s Crawfish Balls

  • 1 lb crawfish tails, chopped fine
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1/4 cup chopped bell peppers
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs

In bowl mix crawfish, pepper, parsley, onions, bell peppers, salt and red pepper.

Add: egg and bread crumbs and mix.

Form into balls (hint, coat hands with oil to make rolling easier).

Place on lightly greased cookie sheet.

Bake at 375 degrees for 12-15 min.

Makes 50 crawfish balls!

Lethal Crab Traps Collected in Christmas Bay

February 28th, 2018

crab trap removal Lethal Crab Traps Collected in Christmas Bay

Brazoria County Gulf Coast Rescue Squad volunteers remove crab traps from Christmas Bay. Volunteer Chuck Courson drives the orange boat at back. The front boat is manned by Boy Scout/Angleton Troop 531. Joeseph West, left, Dylan Hanson on top and non scout volunteer Sterling Greathouse on the deck. BC/GCRS volunteer and Troop 531 leader Mike Hattaway at the wheel. Photo by Jim Olive.

By Janice Van Dyke Walden

The fisherman had been dead for quite a while, and now his crab traps were full.  On the morning of Saturday, February 17, 2018, as the sun came out and the tide retreated, volunteers in airboats found the metal cage crab traps among the grasses in the backwaters of Christmas Bay.  They were full of crabs.

They also found 50 sheepshead trapped at another location, and, like the crabs and all other marine life they find in the traps, they released them.  “Last year, we found a turtle in one of the traps,” says Jim Olive who organizes the effort every year.

When he started the Christmas Bay Foundation years ago, Olive was working to save the sea grasses from shrimpers, and keep a pipeline of human waste from dumping in the shallow pan bay of Follet’s Island.  Now, years later, the shrimpers have been banned, and the pipe re-directed into the Gulf.  The sea grasses flourish, and Christmas Bay has become a popular place for recreational fisherman.

The crab fishermen still place their cage traps out in the waters, but not all can be recovered by the third Friday of each February.  That’s when the State of Texas calls a 10-day closure on crab trap fishing, allowing volunteers to collect what has gone adrift or been forgotten.

“They are a pernicious, lethal killer,” says Olive of the traps.  “When they are abandoned, the crabs die in the trap; the scent that they put out attracts more crabs to the trap.  Those crabs die, and it’s just an ongoing cycle.”

This year, Olive and 14 other volunteers from Boy Scouts, Brazoria County and Texas Parks and Wildlife manned 7 boats for 6 hours, fanning out into the lakes and bayous that eventually feed into Christmas Bay.  They covered more area than in years past.  “It was definitely our most extensive coverage,” says Olive.  In all, the group collected over 60 crab traps.

Bruce Bodson of the Lower Brazos Riverwatch was one of the volunteers.  When he returned to shore, he stomped on the cages he’d collected so they couldn’t be used again.

Since 2002 when the law took effect, over 33,820 abandoned crab traps have been retrieved from Texas coastal waters, from Sabine Lake to Brownsville, with volunteers in the Galveston Bay area and San Antonio Bay consistently collecting the most traps.

To join the effort next year:

www.christmasbayfoundation.org

www.galvbay.org/get-involved/volunteer

Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance Announces 2018 Featured Marques

February 28th, 2018

kwphoto Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance Announces 2018 Featured Marques

The 23rd Annual  Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance, benefiting Today’s Harbor for Children, formerly known as Boys & Girls Harbor, has announced the Featured Marques for the event slated for Saturday and Sunday, May 5-6, 2018.

The Concours, presented by title sponsors Bay Area Regional Medical Center and the City of Seabrook, will feature the automobile Marques of Ferrari, Pierce-Arrow, and Super Cars. The event will also be honoring Vintage Wooden and Classic Glass boats. Owners of classic cars and antique wooden boats are encouraged to register for the judged competition. Judging takes place on Saturday, May 5. The classic boating side of the event is sanctioned by the Antique and Classic Boat Society, an international organization established to standardize the judging procedure.  An incredible array of  classic wooden boats and vintage fiberglass boats, both large and small, will be on display.

The weekend-long, nationally acclaimed classic car and vintage wooden boat show takes place each spring at the Lakewood Yacht Club in beautiful Seabrook, TX and attracts more than 15,000 attendees. The car and boat exhibitors come from every part of the United States, contributing to the more than $1.7 million that the Concours has raised to date for local charities.

Sixty car and 20 boat judges evaluate nearly 40 classes for cars and 20 classes for boats. In addition, Keels & Wheels welcomes celebrity and VIP judges to participate in honoring select vehicles and boats.

Invitations and entry forms for the 2018 Keels & Wheels event are available online. Because only 200 automobiles and 100 boats will be selected, it is important for submissions to be made as early as possible. Potential exhibitors are asked to submit one photo of the car or boat, along with year, make, model, owner information and a brief history of the entry. Keels & Wheels does not typically consider any automobiles newer than 1972 for entry in the event.

For more information about submitting your classic automobile or antique boat, or to download an entry form, please visit www.keels-wheels.com or follow us on Facebook.

About Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance:

Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance is a weekend-long, nationally acclaimed classic car and vintage wooden boat show that takes place each spring at the Lakewood Yacht Club in beautiful Seabrook, Texas. Keels & Wheels welcomes approximately 200 cars and 100 boats, and has raised more than $1.7 million for local charities, while drawing thousands of participants and spectators from all over the U.S. and Europe.

Proceeds from the 2018 event will again benefit Today’s Harbor for Children, whose mission is to provide a home and safe environment for abandoned and abused children and healthy, comprehensive care for children and families in crisis. For more information please visit www.keels-wheels.com or follow us on Facebook.

Meet Debbie Roberts of Pelican Insurance Agency

February 28th, 2018

pelican deb Meet Debbie Roberts of Pelican Insurance AgencyHow did the business get its start?

I formed Pelican Insurance Agency in December of 2017. We are an independent insurance agency that brings better choices and competitive prices to the entire state of Texas.

What coverage does Pelican Insurance offer?

We offer a broad range of insurance products including home, auto, recreation vehicle, watercraft, commercial and more.

How are you different from your competition?

With other agencies, you get one company that sells one brand of insurance, but with Pelican Insurance Agency LLC you get choices and that will allow you to find the best fit your individual or business needs at a competitive price.

What is your mission statement and your business philosophy?

Communication and follow-up is important to us. The goal at Pelican Insurance is to maintain strong, trusting and lasting relationships and to help our customers through all the phases of life. Whether you are moving into a new home, starting your own business, or retiring to spend all your free time on your watercraft, we will make sure you are properly protected.

What certification or special recognition have you received?

We are active members of the Independent Insurance Agents of Texas and affiliated with Trusted Choice. We enjoy an online market access system available exclusively to Big “I” members, and as Best’s Members we access rating content available from A.M. Best Rating Services, Inc. and/or its affiliates.

Tell us about your community involvement.

I am a standing member of the League City Chamber of Commerce.

Where are you from and how did you get your start in insurance?

I grew up in League City and graduated from Clear Creek High School in 1980. I have over 34 years of experience in the insurance industry. I began my insurance career in 1983 as a claims adjuster and worked as a claims professional, which included handling litigation prior to becoming a licensed agent. I am proficient in contract interpretation and can communicate directly with underwriters, inspectors, and claims adjusters to advocate on your behalf.

What do you do with your free time?

I enjoy family life, reading, swimming and soccer

How can customers get in touch?

We offer free insurance quotes, and a risk-free, no obligation coverage analysis to our potential customers. Our contact information is: 832-871-4448

201 Enterprise Avenue Suite 625 League City, TX

www.Pelican-Insurance.com

Facebook: @ Pelicaninsuranceagencytexas

Bay Oil Company Keeps Galveston Bay Moving

February 28th, 2018

bayoil Bay Oil Company Keeps Galveston Bay Moving

Bay Oil Company, a fourth generation, family-owned business, has been serving fuels and lubricants to Houston and the surrounding areas since 1921.  We proudly introduce our new Marine Division, providing non-ethanol fuel to vessels and fleets of all types throughout the greater Galveston Bay system and Houston Ship Channel.

United States Coast Guard approved for over-the-water transfers, we can deliver fuel to you, service dockside fueling, or you can bring your trailered boat to our on-site bulk facility.  On-demand service, 24/7 live dispatch, and customizable delivery schedules set us apart.  Bay Oil Company’s Marine Division is committed to providing the highest quality fuels and services to our clients—keeping you fueled up and on time!

In the Galveston Bay system, we are currently providing fuel to the following client types:  tug boats and barges, racing and pleasure boats, fishing guides, cruise lines, shipping companies, emergency and repair services, fishing fleets and luxury yachts.  Our family lives right here in the Bay Area and we all own boats and love the water.  It was only natural to expand our Bay Oil Company to provide products and services to our friends in the marine industry.

For more information or to set up a delivery:

Call:  833-BAY-FUEL

www.bayoilmarine.com

Galveston Bay Foundation’s Bay Day Festival 2018

February 28th, 2018

27540956 10155551240698439 5713663818272352907 n Galveston Bay Foundations Bay Day Festival 2018

Come celebrate the Bay with us this Earth Month at Bay Day Festival!

Bay Day is a one-day FREE celebration presented by Galveston Bay Foundation and numerous community partners. Festival highlights include bay-themed arts and crafts, wildlife presentations, touch tanks, a scavenger hunt, science and marine exhibits, and more.

NEW THIS YEAR: We’re so excited that Bay Day is taking place in April, making it a signature Earth Month event for the Kemah area. Keep your eyes peeled for new activities and surprises, and tips for promoting a clean and healthy Galveston Bay, one of the largest and most productive estuaries on our planet!

*There is no charge to participate in the Bay Day Festival. Kemah Boardwalk parking fees may apply, as well as other costs associated with using Kemah Boardwalk amusements and restaurants, etc.

For more information, or if you are interested in volunteering or sponsoring Bay Day, Visit our website: www.galvbay.org/bayday

Calling all Women Sailors: Celebrating 31 years of Windward Bound Sailing Camp June 6-9, 2018

January 11th, 2018

WSA Team O BY ED MATUSZAK 1024x636 Calling all Women Sailors: Celebrating 31 years of Windward Bound Sailing Camp June 6 9, 2018

The Houston Yacht Club’s Women’s Sailing Association is now accepting applications for their 2018 Windward Bound Sailing Camp for Women, which will be held June 6-9 at the Houston Yacht Club. The overnight camp is open to all women who are 21 years or older.

Windward Bound Sailing Camp is a great opportunity to learn, expand, or enhance your knowledge and skills in sailing. This camp is the only program of its kind on the bay. It is all about women teaching women how to sail in a fun, friendly, and safe environment. The camp will help you gain new confidence, new skills, and new friends; and is for those new to sailing, those who are familiar with the sport but want to expand their knowledge and skills, and for the experienced sailor who wants to race competitively.

The format of the camp is residential, concentrated, and objective-oriented and features small group instruction with individualized attention. The counselors are accomplished women sailors with years of experience in cruising, racing and teaching other women to sail.

The camp is broken down into four categories to include:

Waves (Beginners): Great for first-time sailors or those of you that need a refresher on the basics! We will focus on terminology, rigging, boat handling skills, sailing theory, and becoming comfortable and confident on the water. Our enthusiastic instructors guide sailors through hands on lessons and adventures making time on the water enjoyable and safe.

Flamingos (Intermediate): After mastering the basics of sailing, our Flamingo group will continue to sharpen their rigging, boat handling and terminology skills. In addition to becoming more comfortable with your beginner knowledge, you will also be introduced to detailed lessons on wind and waves and how they relate to your boat. Intermediate sailing is taught with a greater emphasis on the sailor’s self-reliance; we expect that once the course is completed, the sailor can rig, launch, sail out and back, without assistance and with confidence and efficiency.

Nautigirls (Advanced): Experienced sailors will learn to sharpen their sailing skills. Lesson will be given on fine tuning a boat for speed, skippering, spinnakers, and racing. This group of sailors will perform drills that will enhance their understanding of boat speed and small boat racing.

Mermaids (Big Boat): Sailors in this group will discover all things related to big boats! We will teach the basics of sailing but will also cover details of crewing on or owning a large boat (30+ feet) – everything from working the head to steering with a wheel versus a tiller and maneuvering in and out of the dock. All skill levels are welcome.

Camp Registration

Open to HYC members and non-members but numbers are limited. Registration deadline is May 1, 2018.

Camp Costs:

The cost for camp is $500 for HYC members and $650 for non-HYC members. Camp costs cover room and board, camp shirt, instruction, boat usage and banquet.

Experience the freedom and camaraderie of women’s sailing. For more information, contact one of our co-directors: Joanne Humphries, humphriesjc@hotmail.com or Martha Gillett at fifimg2@gmail.com. You may also contact the HYC office at 281-471- 1255. To download the Windward Bound Camp application, please visit us online at http://houstonyachtclub.com/Portals/0/News/wwb_app_18.pdf.