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10 Things You Can Do to Make Your Sails Last Longer

sailcare 10 Things You Can Do to Make Your Sails Last Longer

By Quantum Sails

1.  KEEP YOUR SAIL OUT OF THE SUN WHEN NOT IN USE.

If you have furling systems, this may be just a matter of furling sails when not in use. For non-furling sails, this means covering or stowing sails. There are cover options for both mainsails and headsails, allowing the sail to stay rigged and protected between uses. When no cover is available, sails should be removed, flaked, bagged and stowed below deck or off the boat.

2. SUN COVERS: SEWN-ON PROTECTION. 

Most owners use sewn-on sun covers to protect furled sails. Sunbrella and WeatherMax are the fabrics commonly used for sun covers. For racer-cruisers and some racing sails like furling code zeros, there are lighter weight options such as UV-treated Dacron®. While there is a gain in weight savings, these materials are not inherently UV resistant. Over time the UV treatment can wear off, with the lifespan of the treatment affected by boat location and amount of time in the sun. In high exposure areas, treated covers may have a lifespan of only a couple of seasons.

All sun covers should be inspected regularly and repaired if damaged. Generally speaking, covers should be re-stitched every three years or so to prevent more extensive damage to the fabric that can occur from flogging due to compromised stitching.

To provide maximum protection for your sails, sun covers require care and maintenance. Remember, if you can see the sailcloth below the cover…so can the sun! Click here to read more about keeping your sails safe from UV rays.

3.  KEEP YOUR SAILS CLEAN.

After sun, the second-worst enemy of any sail is salt; but other types of dirt and debris can be just as damaging. Periodic sail washing is key to maintaining your sails. A couple common-sense rules apply to frequency: 1) a sail that has been exposed to saltwater should be washed sooner rather than later, and 2) all other varying degrees of grime should be removed when possible. A genoa or staysail probably needs washing, or at least a rinse, more frequently than a mainsail that is stowed under a cover on the boom or furled when not in use. Not sure if your sails are salty? Run a finger along the foot and have a taste…you’ll know right away!

4.  HIDE THEM FROM THE ELEMENTS.

Sailmakers generally refer to the life of a sail in hours or seasons, rather than years. The lifespan is affected by the amount of time sailing and the level of care given to the sails. In the mid-Atlantic region, the main sailing season can begin in early spring and extend late into the fall. A sailing season in the upper Midwest, for example, is much shorter, thus extending the life of a sail. The lifespan of sails that spend the sailing season furled on your headstay, in your mast or boom, or left on the boat to endure the frigid months of winter, will be much shorter than the life of sails that are properly protected or stowed.

If you know your sails are going to be sitting idle on the boat in a marina for at least a month or more during a sailing season, you can extend sail life by taking the sails off of your boat and stowing them. If your schedule prevents you from doing this personally, contact your local Quantum loft for sail removal and storage – part of our full array of sail care services.

5.  INSPECT YOUR SAILS REGULARLY AND HAVE AN EXPERT DO SO, TOO.

At least once-a-year sails should get a check-up. To do this yourself, find a dry place in good light where you can lay them flat, then work your way over every inch of the sail, looking for trouble spots such as abrasion or loose stitching. Small problems can turn into bigger problems later, so be sure to note even the smallest details. Alternatively, you can drop off your sails at a nearby Quantum loft for our multi-point inspection. Even simpler, with one call we can handle sail removal, transportation and inspection for one sail or your whole inventory.

6.  TAPE UP THAT TURNBUCKLE!

If you’ve ever scraped your finger on a piece of hardware, then you know it’s sharp enough to damage your sail. Even seemingly blunt objects (like a spreader) can damage sails on a tack, so take a look around (and up) to see what can or should be covered to protect your sails. If you have an extra piece of spinnaker cloth, wipe it across every surface of your boat and rigging. If it snags, put some tape on it. Rigging tape, self-fusing silicone tape, leather and other protective coverings are relatively inexpensive ways to protect your sails.

7.  READ THE WRITING ON THE LEECH.

Even a well-protected spreader-tip or navigation light can wear a sail tack-after-tack. For these areas, a spreader-patch (or navigation light-patch, etc.) might be the answer. Quantum service experts use a variety of materials for these abrasion-resistant patches, ranging from pressure-sensitive-adhesive-backed Kevlar for a racing genoa to Sunbrella® cloth for cruising sails.

8.  FIX IT NOW INSTEAD OF REPLACING IT LATER.

A lot of catastrophic sail failures can be traced back to a small repair that was never made.  When you notice a small hole or a chafed spot that’s getting increasingly worse, save yourself serious head- and wallet-ache by addressing the problem while it is still small. Our service experts have heard more than a few people come into the loft with a shredded sail saying, “I’ve been meaning to get that spot patched”.

9.  BAG IT!

Pretty simple here. There’s a good reason new sails come with a sturdy bag and it’s not just another place for a logo. That bag is a much cheaper sacrificial covering than the sail inside of it. Take a look at an old sail bag that’s scuffed and torn-up, now imagine if that were your sail. Not good. It can be a pain to keep track of bags, but used regularly, they can really earn their keep.

10.  IF YOU DON’T KNOW…ASK.

Curious about some sail-care method you’ve heard somebody touting on the dock or trying to figure out if your sail could use a new piece of webbing on the tack? Feel free to call the service team at your local Quantum loft. We’re happy to field your questions and provide helpful pointers. Consider us a member of your team.

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Contact Quantum Sails Gulf Coast at gulfcoast@quantumsails.com or 281-474-4768 to learn more about protecting your investment. Visit QuantumSails.com for more great tips and tricks to help you meet all of your sailing challenges.

Sailing Events

hyc Sailing EventsHouston Yacht Club:

Jun 24-25 Leukemia Cup Regatta

Jul 4  Great American Cardboard Boat Race

Jul 6-11 38th Annual Leiter Cup Regatta

Jul 15 HYC Summer Series #1

Jul 29 HYC Summer Series #2

History of the Houston Yacht Club

HYC1 History of the Houston Yacht Club

Invitation to the Centennial Celebration of the Houston Yacht Club, 1997. Artwork by Al Barnes. Photos: HYC Archives.

Sam Akkerman, author of the book From Buffalo Bayou to Galveston Bay: The centennial history of the Houston Yacht Club, 1897 to 1997 on how it came to fruition. 

akkerman History of the Houston Yacht Club

Sam Akkerman

How did you get started on this project of writing the book?

I became involved in researching and writing about the history of HYC around 1995, two years before the club’s 100 year anniversary celebration. I was invited to attend one of the Centennial Committee meetings where Fleet Historian Tynes Sparks spoke and explained that one of the committee’s goals was to publish a book on the Club’s history and he needed help.

He had boxes of old photographs, clippings, and collections of stories he had been putting together for years. Few early records still existed, but Tynes knew the Club’s legendary history was worth telling and that documentation existed at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center (HMRC).

 As an English major who had always enjoyed research and writing, I was intrigued. Tynes and I scheduled a visit to the HMRC.

On that initial visit we found a Houston Post article describing the first formal meeting of the Club, February 2, 1898 at the Binz Building, Houston’s first skyscraper. It was a thrilling find and I quickly became fascinated by the Club’s history stashed away in that building.

Because the Club’s founders were prominent Houstonians, I read everything I could find on the city’s history and the early 20th century development of the Galveston Bay area as a summer destination for Houston residents.

I located and interviewed many children and grandchildren of the founders and early members. They were all aware of their families’ connections to HYC and generously shared photos and stories.

What surprised you the most as you gathered information about the history of the club?

Many discoveries were made along the way. When I started, we knew that the Club originally met and kept their boats near the foot of Main Street in downtown Houston. Research enabled  us to document specific locations: for a while a wharf was leased at the foot of Travis Street and meetings were held in a ‘tin shack’ near today’s Spaghetti Warehouse.

Another important ‘discovery’ was realizing the true significance of our early membership in the Gulf Yachting Association (GYA). In 1920 we became a founding member of the venerable southern boating organization that promoted inter-club competition in affordable one design boats from Florida to Texas. A bay home was needed for the boats, practices, and competition required by the amateur, family friendly, GYA program which the Club embraced wholeheartedly. I  believe the mission HYC fulfills today was shaped by that program.

And I must mention the oft forgotten role the Club played in the early development of the Houston Ship Channel. The members were not only vocal in their support but their yachts were used to tour dignitaries and visitors who had the power to influence the legislation to dredge the Bayou and Bay into a waterway that would accommodate ocean going vessels.

This focus of the Club continued until World War I. By then the Port was well on its way to becoming the giant we know it as today.

Madlin Stevenson and friends on an R-boat in the Houston Yacht Club harbor in 1929.

Is there a favorite story about some of the members that made you laugh out loud when you were doing research?

Humor reigned throughout the years. Choosing one incident is impossible. Theme parties with elaborate costumes were the norm after World War II. Props might include a live donkey in the Porthole bar or an old footed bathtub for serving “bootleg gin.” Beginning in 1936 the Dumbbell Award was presented periodically to recognize boating mishaps. Recipients and their ‘dumb’ mistakes were carefully recorded in a small gold stamped binder.  Helmsmen, not crew, falling overboard seem to have been quite common.

Where did you grow up and when did you become a member of the Houston Yacht Club?

I was born in Louisiana but grew up in Texas.  My family moved to Houston when I was 12.

In 1989, my husband bought a catamaran and we were sailing it one weekend when we saw a long line of Sunfish being towed behind a motor boat. Each boat had a young skipper on board, relaxing as they cruised along under tow. We learned they were HYC Ragnots (as the Club’s youth are called) and they were on their way across the Bay to an inter-club regatta. My daughters were 9 and 12, a perfect age to become Ragnots and the next summer I was one of the moms in the motor boats towing kids across the Bay.

Is there a favorite time period in the club’s history that really stands out in your mind?

The early years of the Club are among my favorites to study. Members had a fleet of amazing long, sleek luxury yachts which would rival any port in the south. They were prominent businessmen who worked tirelessly to promote the city and ship channel. Yet they commissioned a fleet of small one design sailboats for fair competition. Their younger members formed the Launch Club Canoe Division and explored islands in the Bayou that have long since disappeared. Their cruises were intended for family members and their regattas were events designed to be enjoyed by all ages, boaters and ‘landlubbers’ alike.

Are you currently working on any other projects?

We are proud to have a very well documented article on HYC’s history accepted and included in the recently launched Handbook of Houston, a publication of the Handbook of Texas Online, the most highly respected resource of state history.

Another months long project completed this spring is a permanent exhibit at the Club that honors HYC’s nationally recognized reputation for excellence in race management. Our research documented the national, international, and world regattas that HYC has hosted in the last 120 years. This information was then incorporated into a striking professionally designed display in the Club’s lobby. The project commemorates our 90/120 Celebration – this year the clubhouse is 90 years old and the organization is 120 years old.

Tell me a little bit about your relationship with Rice University.

In 2010 a large portion of our archives was digitized as part of an online exhibit that includes materials from Rice University and the Houston Area Digital Archives at the Houston Public Library. The exhibit, Business and Pleasure on Houston Waterways, explores the relationship Houston has with Buffalo Bayou and Galveston Bay. It was an honor for us to be included in this project and it also provided us with a unique opportunity to preserve our archival materials – the scanned images are safe – permanently stored and accessible online. As well, it  provides another method of sharing our history.

View overlooking lawn, wading pool, signal mast and harbor of the Houston Yacht Club during the Annual Regatta of 1954.

The Houston Yacht Club has a long tradition of bringing families together who love boating on Galveston Bay. In your opinion, is this still the best way to describe the mission of the club today?

Yes. Bringing together families who love the bay does describe what HYC is all about. As the older Ragnots leave for college, a new generation sails out to claim their own place in the cluster of Optis at the start line. Experienced sailors teach the sport and share their boats with novices. New volunteers join the long time volunteers who organize the programs and events for all ages and the well run regattas that make Galveston Bay a nationally known recreational boating center.

100+ Years of Sailing: A History of Sailing Clubs on Galveston Bay

hyc 100+ Years of Sailing: A History of Sailing Clubs on Galveston Bay

Houston Yacht Club   

Organized in 1897, the club was located on Buffalo Bayou in Houston. It was known as the Houston Yacht and Power Boat Club from 1905-1906, and the Houston Launch Club from 1906-1926. In 1927 the club went back to the original name Houston Yacht Club.

Always more than simply a social or boating organization, during the early years it was identified with some of the most fundamental developments in Houston’s growth.

The present day club house was built in 1927 in La Porte. Hurricanes and fires have left their mark on the original building but she still stands today. A charter member of the Gulf Yachting Association, the club is now over a hundred and twenty years old.

seabrooksailing 100+ Years of Sailing: A History of Sailing Clubs on Galveston Bay

Seabrook Sailing Club

The club was founded in 1934 as a means to enjoy sailing with friends in Galveston Bay. That philosophy continues today. The original club was located along the Kemah waterfront.

In 1950 the club purchased the property at 1020 Todville Rd. in Seabrook. Hurricane Ike destroyed the club house in 2008. The new club house was rebuilt and completed through dedicated club members.

Early Members: Earl Gerloff and Martin Bludworth

Texas Corinthian Yacht Club 

Founded in 1938 to educate its members and their families in the art of sailing, seamanship and boat handling.

The original clubhouse completed in 1938 was destroyed by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. The new club house and rebuilt grounds were dedicated Jan. 1, 2010.

Founding Members: Albert Bel Fay, Ernest Bel Fay, Jack Garrett, William Stamps Farish, and William McIver Streetman

Galveston Bay Cruising Association 

GBCA traces its origin back to 1947 when a small group of sailboat racing enthusiasts informally organized the club.  The club existed and prospered as a letter head organization, without elected officers, bylaws, dues, or a home.

The Club was formally organized in 1954 with elected officials, bylaws and handicap races. The Friday night Rum Races are some of the most popular races run on Galveston Bay.

Early member:  Rufus Bud Smith

Lakewood Yacht Club      

Founded in 1955 the club sits on 38 acres with water frontage on Clear Lake. It has four covered sheds and numerous docks. The original club just catered to power boats, but over the years sailboats kept showing up and the club kept growing. Lakewood Yacht Club will host the J-105 North Americans this fall.

Founding Members: Sterling Hogan Sr., Captain WR Parker and JD Kirkpatrick.

2017 AND BEYOND: THE FUTURE OF SAILING

Learning to Fly with Next Generation USA

Whether you are a seasoned sailor or just getting your feet wet, you can’t help but look in awe at the America’s Cup boats – fast, foiling multihulls with a wing instead of a sail.

The United States, represented by team Next Generation USA, is one of 12 countries entered in the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup.  Each team is allowed seven days of practice on the AC45F prior to the event in June.  That’s it, just seven days on a boat unfamiliar to anyone outside a small circle of America’s Cup Teams.

The AC45F is sailed with six crew members and each one has a critical job.  The wing controls the overall power of the boat, so it is in constant motion.  In order to get foiling, the boat needs to be going at least 16 knots and all of the crew must be on the windward side.  Getting up to speed is like taking off in an airplane. The adrenaline is pumping but no one seems concerned that they are screaming downwind, six feet above the water on a 45ft carbon rocket.

Next Generation USA is more than just a group of young sailors. These guys are the face of our country and they will be representing the USA at the highest level of sailing.

Members of Next Generation USA

  • Carson Crain Skipper/Helmsman
  • Matthew Whitehead Wing Trimmer
  • Scott Ewing Soft Sail Trimmer
  • Preston Farrow Grinder
  • Ian Storck Grinder (spare)
  • Markus Edegran Bowman
  • Reed Baldridge Tactician

Don’t Let Your Sails Get Burned

silken 2015 06 03 0499 Don’t Let Your Sails Get Burned

By Quantum Sails

Nobody likes getting sunburned, and neither do your sails. What happens when the sun burns your sails?

If not properly protected, sunburned sails can tear while in use, stranding you and your family. Ultraviolet (UV) covers can help protect your sails and your sailing season. Even seasonal UV exposure in the Northern latitudes can cause serious problems in a short amount of time. Quantum Sails Pacific Loft Service Manager Emre Kalaycioglu has a lot of experience helping customers. Here are his tips.

WHY ARE UV COVERS IMPORTANT?

If you have a furling genoa or mainsail, you probably keep it on your rig for an extended period of time. However, the elements – especially the sun – are harmful to your sails. Over the years, the sun will begin to burn out the sail’s leech, and sunburn will appear on the sail. These sunburned areas weaken over time. While sailing, stress on the sails can cause the threads to break in the weaker areas. A proper UV cover can protect your investment from the damaging UV rays of the sun.

HOW DO I TAKE CARE OF THE UV COVER?

A common misconception is that when a UV cover is installed it will last forever, but the sail cover actually needs to be maintained to last.

Something that most people overlook about their UV covers is how often they need to be re-stitched in order to last. While the UV cover can last anywhere from 4-8 seasons – depending greatly on exposure and maintenance – the thread may only last about half the lifespan of the cover, as it degrades faster than the cover itself. Bringing your sails into your local Quantum Sails loft to have the covers re-stitched will increase the lifespan of your UV covers and ultimately your sails.

Another common mistake most sailors make is keeping their sails hoisted on the boat for an extended period of time. It’s important to drop your sails and, whenever possible, keep them in a cool, dry place between sailing trips. To prevent the UV cover from deteriorating, wash your sails with fresh, clean water on a regular basis, then let them dry completely before refurling (washing and drying is very important for your sails, especially after a rainy season).

When leaving the boat, take extra caution to make sure your sails are set and won’t come loose with any strong winds. An extra sail tie could help prevent your sails from flogging, which will protect your sails and UV cover from extra wear and tear.

WHEN IS IT TIME TO SERVICE?

UV covers degrade with UV exposure and use. While a UV cover in New England may last anywhere from 6-8 seasons, that same cover in the Caribbean may only last 3-4 seasons.

It’s important to check over your sails at the beginning and end of every season. See if there are any chafed or damaged areas on your sail and UV cover. Be sure to check the side of the sail opposite the UV cover. If you see any color change on that side, it’s time to replace the UV cover as soon as possible, as the discoloration means the current UV cover has expired and is no longer protecting your sail against the sun. Delaying that replacement can cause extensive damage to the sail.

WHAT MATERIALS DO YOU SUGGEST FOR A UV COVER?

At Quantum Sails, we recommend Sunbrella UV Cover fabric. Our sewing machine thread we generally use is 138 Dabond thread for sewing UV covers – it’s thicker than what our competitors use, and thus lasts a little bit longer. We can also use UV stable thread, such as Tenara or SolarFix thread, but it’s considerably more expensive, so may not always be the best option.

For more great sailing tips and tricks or to learn about Quantum Sails, visit www.QuantumSails.com.

Family, Fun and Friendships: One Hundred Years of Commitment to the Sea

yacht sales co family Family, Fun and Friendships: One Hundred Years of Commitment to the Sea

Owner of the Yacht Sales Company, Jonathon Davis with his wife Kim, son Cole and daughter Camille at the Sea Star Base Galveston. Photography by Ashley Henry with Hey Pretty Baby Photography.

The Yacht Sales Company

Throughout history sailing has been instrumental in the development of civilization, affording humanity greater mobility than travel over land, whether for trade transport or warfare, and the capacity for fishing. Sailing for pleasure can involve short trips across a bay, day sailing, coastal cruising, and more extended offshore or ‘blue-water’ cruising. These trips can be singlehanded or the vessel may be crewed by families or groups of friends.

For the last 100 years the Mecca of sailing in the United States is the Gulf Coast of Texas, more specifically Galveston Bay, the third largest boating community in the United States. Galveston Bay has a prolific sailing and water lifestyle that embodies beautiful traditions for family, fun, and friendships.

Jonathon Davis, owner and founder of The Yacht Sales Company located in Kemah, has a family with this type of lifestyle. Jonathon and his lovely wife, Kim, have more than 150,000 sea miles between the two of them. Jonathon actually proposed to Kim on a dive on one of their trips at sea. Jonathon feels that family always comes first and has his 4 year old son, Cole, and new baby girl, Camille, go sailing as much as possible. Fun is always a factor with this family.

When Jonathon was creating The Yacht Sales Company he understood what it meant to have a rich history of sailing with the vendors he was choosing to represent and promote at his dealership. He specifically sought out Groupe Beneteau, who has the richest yachting tradition in the industry being privately owned for 130 years. This is reflected deeper in their purchase of CNB and Lagoon, who TYSC is the dealer for as well. With the dealership being located in Kemah, bordering Galveston Bay, he has much to say about family, fun, and friendships on the water.

beneteau 300x224 Family, Fun and Friendships: One Hundred Years of Commitment to the Sea

Jonathon and Kim Davis with Jean Morrison.

Beneteau boatyard, headquartered in France with manufacturing facilities located in South Carolina, was created in 1884 by Benjamin Beneteau. He was a very determined young man and at the early age of 12 he became a ship’s boy on the lugger, Eliza. His dream of building boats would begin on the boatyard of his friend’s father. His determination would convince his uncle, and he entered Rochefort Maritime towards the end of 1879 for his military service. Once out, he decided to create his boatyard near a bridge called, Quai des Greniers, and called his place “Beneteau.” Today, Beneteau is the largest sailboat manufacturer in the world.

Beneteau 1962-1964 and a Beneteau Oceanis Yacht 62.

The growth of Beneteau has been nothing but extraordinary, and it has acquired and incorporated Prestige, CNB, Lagoon, O’Hara, I.R.M., BH, Four Winns, Glastron, Wellcraft, Scarab and Monte Carlo Yacht. Annette Beneteau-Roux has been in command and control of Beneteau for the last 40 years and gives credit to their success to her family, executives, loyal and talented employees, as well as dealers and customers throughout the world, all of whom have become friends. “I believe we are one of the oldest boat building yards in the world to be run by the family as a majority,” said Annette Beneteau-Roux.

Another amazing line within this sailboat dynasty, that holds great family traditions, is Lagoon, which is in association with CNB Yacht Builders. The Lagoon model was established in 1984 and was originally a shipyard building monohull and multihull offshore racing boats. The first generation of cruising catamarans was launched from 1987 to 1996. They are celebrating their 30th year and today the company distributes its yachts in 53 countries. Davis said that the Lagoon is one of the dealerships best sellers! Recently, Jonathon Davis and team, won the Harvest Moon Regatta with owner John Sherer on Sherer’s Lagoon 42 against eight other boats.

When speaking with Davis, he noted that one of the oldest brands of sailing vessels in the United States was Alden. He, and wife Kim, co-captained one of their vessels, the “Krisujen,” designed by Alden.

Alden began his design career as an apprentice in 1902 and started his own design firm in 1909. He had modest success until he won his first Bermuda Race and experienced great success. His race victories were with Malabar VII and Malabar X in 1932 and continued until the long-lived design business finally closed in 2008. Today, the extensive Alden design archive has been gifted to the Hart Nautical Collections of MIT Museum. Jonathon commented that the Krisujen was a dynamic sailing experience and many wonderful memories were established while captaining this vessel.

The Escapade.

The sailing vessel, “Escapade,” built in 1938, holding an impressive amount of racing titles, and becoming known as Queen of the Great Lakes, holds deep inspiration for Jonathon Davis because of one special woman named Jean Morrison. While he was telling the tales of Jean and her exuberance for life, you can hear the admiration and excitement he had for this very special lady. With sailing stories ranging from stateside to international waters the one of the Escapade is one of his favorites. Jean’s husband was not much of a sailor but he appreciated the love that his wife had for sailing. He offered her something she couldn’t refuse. He said, “If you could have any sailboat you wanted what would it be?” Without hesitation she said, “Well, I would want the Escapade!” The vessel held a special place in her heart because she remembers cleaning it as a young girl. The request was granted and it launched an exciting time of sailing worldwide with a crew including her pet monkey. She told Jonathon once, with her childlike enthusiasm, “Jonathon, when you get as old as I am and you find something you love, you damned well better enjoy it!” He has never forgotten those words and makes it a motto for the way he views life.

To bring this story full circle, “friends” would be a good place to end. One of Jonathon Davis dearest friends and closest confidants was Roy Newberry, Sr. Roy had a vivacious life on the water and Davis states, “Everything I know about the water I owe to Roy Newberry.” Sailing brought these two together and the life long friendship never faltered. They sailed together, raced together, and actually won Jonathon’s first Harvest Moon Regatta dating back to 1992 on the sailboat, Alessandra. Jonathon admired everything about this sailor and loved his family. The stories that were shared between them are those of legends.

Jonathon so greatly respected Roy’s life in the local community and to sailing that he did a Cannon Dedication and race in appreciation of his devoted service to both humanity and the sport of sailing before his passing in 2016. Roy always told his kids, “See that crumby little boat over there; realize you can go wherever you want in the world in that!”

In the world of sailing heartstrings are pulled, passion is flared, and history is always made. Jonathon Davis and his family have enjoyed this “sailing life” for a quarter of a century and looks forward to many more years to come. Nothing is more exciting than establishing lifelong memories that are made with family, fun, and friendships due to a commitment to the sea and all that goes with it.

For more information on The Yacht Sales Company please visit www.theyachtsalescompany.com.

 

New Sails Aren’t Always the Best Answer

By Quantum Sails

Sadly there is no such thing as a sail that lasts forever. However, when your sails become stretched out and lose their shape, it doesn’t necessarily mean you need new ones. Learn about Precision Recuts to help extend the life of your sails and save you money.

It’s never a fun moment when you realize your trusty sail won’t let you point to the mark or when the wind picks up and you can’t control the heel and your glass of wine takes a trip down your shirt. Thankfully buying a new sail isn’t your only option.

Precision Recuts bring almost 90% of your sail’s original shape back to life. Both membrane and woven sails are candidates for reshaping and a recut will often cost less than 20% of a new sail. The condition of the sailcloth is key; it must not be too worn and stretchy or the adjustments will not produce the desired results. With good fabric, reshaping can generally be done once or twice during the life of a sail.

C&C 30 Extreme 2 owner Dan Cheresh says “I have been able to continually adjust and refine sail shape through recuts to keep my sails as fast as possible.” Erin Houpt from Dream Yacht Charter has trusted recuts for all of the in-mast furling mainsails in his fleet. “The sails are easier to furl and our customers are pleased with the increased performance.”

Our National Service Director Charlie Saville outlines the three main options to help increase performance and enjoyment for racing and cruising sails.

Broad Seam Reshape New Sails Arent Always the Best Answer

Broad Seam Reshape

PROBLEM: Deep draft. Full sail. Can’t point very high.

The sail depth becomes fuller and more rounded. The draft moves aft. You’re no longer able to point as high as when the sail was new. The boat becomes harder to steer, heels more and responsiveness is slowed. For racing boats, the inability to hold a lane or position close to other boats can really destroy a tactical game plan.

SOLUTION: Seam reshape.

Seams are reshaped and extra fabric is removed. This procedure flattens the sail and helps return the draft to the original and optimal location. Generally, three to five seams are remade to achieve desired shape.

RESULT: Faster sail. Points higher!

With the flatter sail you can now point higher than before! Your sail is flatter, faster and more efficient. Your boat sails more upright, and is far more responsive.

Luft Curve Reshape New Sails Arent Always the Best Answer

Luff Curve Reshape

PROBLEM: Reduced entry. Sail is hard to steer.

As sails age, their entry is reduced due to a variety of factors. Stretch, as well as over-tensioning the halyard can reduce entry. Reduced entry will make the sail harder to trim, less efficient and make steering more difficult (and less fun!)

SOLUTION: Luff curve change.

Luff curve can be restored to help return the sail to its original entry shape. Sometimes a luff curve change is made to remove entry and flatten the sail.

RESULT: Faster. Easier to steer sails.

Returning entry gives you a bigger range to steer inside of that is still ultra-fast. Steering will be easier and you’ll be able to go faster.

Leech Takeup

PROBLEM: Leech falls away. Sail isn’t delivering power.

On cruising Dacron® mainsails and genoas, the leech can stretch and fall away, making the sail more difficult to trim and reducing boat speed. This is especially prevalent on larger cruising mainsails and mainsails with large roaches. Leech stretch can also hamper the use of furling systems.

SOLUTION: Leech takeup.

By removing extra fabric at a seam or elsewhere on the sail, the leech can be shortened and straightened to its original dimensions and shape.

RESULT: Smooth leech with proper power and exit. More powerful sail.

By bringing the leech back to its in-line design shape, the sail is once a gain a proper foil and will deliver efficient power.

Contact Quantum Sails Gulf Coast at gulfcoast@quantumsails.com or 281-474-4768 to learn more about Precision Recuts and find out if your sail is a candidate. Visit QuantumSails.com for more great tips and tricks to help you meet all of your sailing challenges.

Red Bull Youth America’s Cup

red bull cup Red Bull Youth Americas Cup

Team Next Generation USA. Photo by Theo Queen.

The twelve teams that will compete in the 2017 Red Bull Youth Americas Cup competition are breaking new ground for young sailors all over the world. They will be racing foiling catamarans and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

All of the competitors, whose ages range from 19 to 24, are getting a taste of what the real America’s Cup teams must deal with in order to compete and perform well in this pressure packed arena known as the America’s Cup sailing.

Fund raising is one of the new skills this team must acquire in order to stick around for the finals. Racing these boats is very expensive. Sails and hardware are pushed to the limits. The crews will train non-stop from now until June aiming to make the finals. All of this costs money. Next Generation USA needs your help. Six guys were chosen to represent our country and have a very good chance to win the regatta. Two of them, Carson Crain and Reed Baldridge, are local guys who grew up sailing right here on Galveston Bay. To make a contribution to the campaign, contact Carson Crain, cmcrain@gmail.com.

 teamnextgen Red Bull Youth Americas Cup

About the Red Bull Youth Americas Cup

Dates: Qualifiers: June 12 – 16 Finals: June 20 – 21

Location: The Great Sound, Bermuda.

Format: Fleet Racing, two qualifying series with six teams in each. Top four teams in each series move on to Finals

Teams: Twelve teams, each representing their country will compete. All team members must be citizens of the country they represent

Boats: The AC45F, a 45-footer that will fly on hydrofoils. Specifications for the AC45F indicate the boat is capable of reaching speeds of over 35 knots, or 40mph/65kmh. The eight AC45Fs used in the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup are the only such boats in the entire world.

Crew: Six sailors onboard. Ages 19 – 24 years

Amenities: America’s Cup Village, Hospitality Tents, Spectator Boats, Grandstand Seating, Jumbotron Screen Viewing

The Location

In 2017, Bermuda’s Great Sound will form a natural amphitheater for the America’s Cup, and the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup will use exactly the same racecourse. Sailing conditions in Bermuda are typically exceptional in June, with historical wind data suggesting that there should be racing conditions 90 percent of the time.

The Boat

In 2017, the youth teams will be sailing the AC45F, a 45-footer that will fly on hydrofoils. Specifications for the AC45F indicate the boat is capable of reaching speeds of over 35 knots, or 40 mph/65kmh. The eight AC45Fs used in the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup are the only such boats in the entire world.

The Teams

Up to 12 national youth teams, each composed of six sailors aged 19-24, will race in the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup 2017, each representing a different nation. Six teams will race through their affiliation with current America’s Cup teams, while up to six additional teams will compete as selected by Red Bull Sport Directors Roman Hagara and Hans Peter Steinacher.

2017 Red Bull Youth America’s Cup Teams

  • Candidate Sailing Team, Austria
  • Team BDA, Bermuda
  • Youth Vikings Denmark, Denmark
  • Team France Jeune, France
  • SVB Team Germany, Germany
  • Land Rover BAR Academy, Great Britain
  • Kaijin Team Japan, Japan
  • NZL Sailing Team, New Zealand
  • Spanish Impulse Team, Spain
  • Artemis Youth Racing, Sweden
  • Team Tilt, Switzerland
  • Next Generation USA, USA

Sea Star Base Galveston Spring Team Race Series

15894631 683956928452037 8901466855224964972 n Sea Star Base Galveston Spring Team Race SeriesNotice of Race
February 11-12, 2017
March 18-19, 2017
April 8-9, 2017

HOST: The OPEN 3v3 Team Race Regatta will be hosted by Sea Base Galveston. The regatta will be held at Sea Base Galveston 7509 Broadway, Galveston, Texas 77554.

Schedule:
Saturday
0900 Competitors meeting
1000 First Race
TBD Informal Umpire Debrief

Sunday
0900 Competitors meeting
1000 First Race
Sunday no race to start after 1400

BOATS: Racing will be in FJs available through Sea Star Base Galveston. Collegiate 420’s may be used if demand warrants.

FORMAT: The regatta will be open 3v3 team racing. The regatta will be governed by the rules as defined in the Racing Rules of Sailing 2017-2020.

HOUSING: Housing will be available at Sea Star Base Galveston, the site of the regatta. Reservations should be made during registration on regatta network. SSBG is offering accommodations for $25/night/individual. These are apartment suites with shared bathroom; rooms can accommodate males and females). Housing reservations with SSBG should be arranged at least one week in advance.

BERTHS AND ENTIRES: Berths will be available to the first 12 teams registered. Registration can be found on regatta network or at ssbgalveston.org >Community Sailing >Racing. Entry requires $212 fee and $300 damage deposit (damage deposit to “Sea Star Base Galveston.”)

REGISTRATION: 1. https://www.regattanetwork.com/clubmgmt/applet_registration_form.php?regatta_id=13708
2. https://www.regattanetwork.com/clubmgmt/applet_registration_form.php?regatta_id=13707
3. https://www.regattanetwork.com/clubmgmt/applet_registration_form.php?regatta_id=13710

WAIVERS: Each team should complete the SSBG waiver

CONTACT: Mike Janota Work Phone 409-572- 2562 x1 Cell Phone 409-457- 6453 e-mail mjanota@ssbgalveston.org

Suzy Bradford Cell Phone 832-405- 8336 e-mail sbradford@ssbgalveston.org

Team Next Generation USA named to represent USA in the 2017 Red Bull Youth America’s Cup

IMG 4097 Team Next Generation USA named to represent USA in the 2017 Red Bull Youth America’s Cup

Team Next Generation USA

America’s Cup Event Authority along with Red Bull Sports Directors, Roman Hagara and Hans-Peter Steinacher, announced today that Next Generation USA would be the team representing the United States of America at the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup event in Bermuda in June.   The team is made up of six sailors, ages 20 – 24, with many different sailing backgrounds and experiences.  Helmsman Carson Crain and wing-trimmer Matthew Whitehead, a veteran from 2013 Youth America’s Cup, are fresh off Olympic campaigns in the Mens’ RS:X windsurfer and Nacra 17 multihull.  Tactician, Reed Baldridge and bowman Markus Edegran have recently completed successful college sailing careers and are pursuing sailing as a profession.  Scott Ewing, soft sail trimmer, is a multi-talented skiff and multihull sailor and Preston Farrow brings experience on the GC32 and knowledge of the Bermuda venue to the team.  “On this boat, the name of the game is teamwork.  Communication, co-operation and confidence in our abilities will be our strengths,” says Crain.

Next Generation USA has a full schedule of training for the next five months leading up to the Youth America’s Cup.  Their coach, Iker Martinez, a multiple world champion and Olympic medalist, adds, “These guys are willing to put in the hard work to get to the top.  They recognize that success at this event requires more than just sailing ability.”

The 2017 Youth America’s Cup is held in conjunction with the 35th America’s Cup and will take place June 12 – 21 in Bermuda during the America’s Cup event.  Sailors will compete on the AC45F boats used in the Louis Vuitton World Series events around the world, including racing in New York Harbor and Chicago in 2016.  All teams will take part in a qualifying series and the top eight teams will compete in the finals, June 20-21.

For more information:

http://red-bull-youth.americascup.com

http://nextgenerationusa.org

Quantum Sails’ Alan Woodyard

Delivering exceptional sail care services and custom canvas products

quantum woodyard Quantum Sails Alan Woodyard

Quantum Sails’ Loft Service Manager Alan Woodyard has sailed across the globe. Now he uses his expertise to provide solutions to his clients’ canvas and sail problems.

alan woodyard Quantum Sails Alan Woodyard

Quantum Sails’ Alan Woodyard

Where were you born and what are some of your best childhood memories?

I was born in Havre de Grace, Md. Some of my favorite memories are from spending time in Ocean City, as well as trips to visit family in Ohio and Illinois.

What are some of the duties that you perform in your current job?

As loft service manager and ambassador for new canvas fabrication, I provide evaluations, recommendations and maintenance for sails and canvas products. I help with sail removals, installations and onboard sail assessments as well as sail repairs. I also build custom canvas items from scratch, starting with the design phase through production and installation.

How long have you been working for Quantum Sails?

I started with Quantum Sails in Annapolis and worked there for two years before I began work at the Seabrook Loft, where I’ve been for eight months. In between stints with Quantum, I founded and operated my own canvas shop in Annapolis.

I loved working with Quantum, so it was an easy decision to join them when the opportunity arose. I also am proud of the training I received through Hood Canvas Training School in Merrimac, MA. I’ve also been an active leader and participant in the local marine trade associations.

How did you get into the industry?

I got interested in sailing while in college and decided to take an Outward Bound sailing course out of Hurricane Island in Maine. After that I was hooked and eventually found my way to the Professional Mariner Training Program at the Chapman School of Seamanship, where I knew that I had found my passion. I excelled and finished at the top of my class.

After seamanship school, I planned to look for a gig as a crew member on a sailboat, with my backup option being a move to Fort Lauderdale to search for a job on a super yacht. Fortunately, about a week before my move to Fort Lauderdale, I was contacted by a boat owner who had just lost a crew member and was looking for help in Nassau, Bahamas.

Three days after the first email I was on a plane to Nassau and stayed for the next five years as a crew member on sailing yachts ranging from 45 to 65 feet. I traveled as far east as Portugal and the Canary Islands, and as far west as Tahiti, with many stops in the Caribbean and elsewhere.

How did you get into canvas specifically?

At one point during my five years on cruising boats we had an enclosure built for a boat’s cockpit. After watching that type of work, I became convinced that I could do similar projects on the boat; things like hatch covers and dinghy chaps. We got a little Sailrite portable sewing machine on the boat and we never bought canvas again. I made a variety of different items for the boat that I was on and was commissioned to make dinghy chaps for a couple of other boats while in remote harbors where canvas work is hard to come by.

When I returned to the States, I starting looking for a job in a sail and canvas loft. Through a mutual friend, I was put in touch with the Quantum Sails loft in Annapolis and started doing exactly the type of work that I was hoping to do. After starting out in the loft, I further advanced my canvas fabrication skills by attending a program at Hood Marine Canvas Training in Merrimac, Mass.

What are some of the biggest changes that you have seen in the canvas business in the last 10 years?

It would easily be the introduction of laser templaters to aid in the templating process. They standardize 3D measurement on the yacht, allowing one to build a 3D model of the finished product that aids construction back in the loft. This not only increases the quality of the finished product, but also can help cut down on some of the labor required.

There has also been a lot of development in UV resistant and stable materials, including thread, which helps me build better products. One item, Solarfix thread, is UV stable and will outlast your canvas, eliminating the need for re-stitches due to thread failure.

When does a typical day for you start, and what does it look like?

We start around 8 a.m. here in the loft. I check the weather to see what outdoor work can be accomplished that day, including patterning for new canvas, and/or sail removals. Then it’s back to the loft for new canvas builds, repairing sails, or maybe a precision recut on a sail for higher performance. Then I take time to communicate with all of our clients and answer any questions they may have. Then I’m back on the floor until 5 p.m. to finish projects and help get our clients back on the water.

What are the most popular color choices of canvas on the market today and why are these products and colors so popular?

Captain and Pacific Blue are wildly popular, as is Cadet Grey. I think the grey is popular as it doesn’t fade as much and tends to hide some of the dirt/wear and tear. The blues are a good match for wood and are classic yachting colors that match with just about anything. Natural (white) tends to be avoided as it shows dirt relatively easily.

If you take care of your bimini, how long should it last in the sun-drenched Gulf Coast environment?

A lot depends on what “taking care of it” means! We tend to think of items in terms of seasons. With our area’s year-round sailing, we’re eating up two seasons of use per calendar year. Provided one builds their bimini out of premium products, including UV stable thread, I’d expect a bimini to last 12 seasons, or 6 years.

A lot depends upon use. If you’re not going to use your yacht for a few months, and removing the bimini doesn’t compromise the yacht, take it off and stow it below. You can dramatically extend the life of these items by shielding them from the sun when not in use.

Dodgers and cockpit enclosures protect the entry way of the sailboat and crew from rain and waves. The right design also enhances boat styling. Well built canvas products like these can provide many years of comfort and enjoyment. Photo by Cory Silken.

SUNBRELLA CARE TIPS

  • Hose fabric off on a monthly basis or anytime the boat is coming back from having been out in significant salt spray.
  • Use a mild soap and water solution over entirety, allow it to soak on the fabric for a few minutes.
  • Spot scrub where necessary with a soft bristle brush. Rinse thoroughly.
  • After approximately three years if Sunbrella begins to be less water-resistant the fabric can be treated with 303 Fabric Guard.
  • If you don’t have the time or inclination to DIY give us a call here at Quantum Sails in Seabrook, (281-474-4168) we can take care of it for you and have it back on the boat in time for your next day on the water!

Several Lakewood Youth Sailors Spending Christmas Break at Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta in Miami

unnamed1 3 300x197 Several Lakewood Youth Sailors Spending Christmas Break at Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta in MiamiLakewood sent three C420 Teams with Coach Marek Valesek to their first C420 Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta in Miami over Christmas break.

The two-person teams of Alex Wise/Laurel Tyson, Grace Bates/Pilar Blanco Midulla and Paul/Celia Houston as well as several other youth sailors were in full learning mode this past weekend, as accomplished sailor and Yale Assistant Sailing Coach Bill Healy afforded the racers his knowledge of C420 racing. Healy, spent two days at Lakewood Yacht Club training the spirited young sailors.

unnamed 6 300x214 Several Lakewood Youth Sailors Spending Christmas Break at Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta in Miami“We practiced in very breezy conditions,” said Healy. “If the kids see similar conditions in Miami they will feel much more comfortable since Galveston Bay doesn’t usually offer those types of conditions. The group has a whole is fairly fresh to the C420 class but no strangers to these large events. Look for them to post some great individual races and results.”

Strong 20-knot winds were enjoyed both days of the clinic, which focused on boat preparation, tuning guidelines, rigging the boats, and then basic trimming and hiking techniques as well as mark roundings. However, Sunday was 40 degrees colder than Saturday, so Healy, Valesek and the rest of the coaches utilized videos of high-level sailing to give the kids something to visualize. The young sailors took furious notes during the debriefings before braving the cold to practice the techniques on the water. A lot of kids went swimming, but there were notable improvements over Saturday’s performances.

Lakewood wishes all it’s Orange Bowl competitors luck in Miami.

Visit www.lakewoodyachtclub.com to learn more about Lakewood Yacht Club’s youth sailing program.

About Lakewood Yacht Club

Rated among the top 10 yacht clubs in the United States, Lakewood Yacht Club (LYC) is one of the best-kept secrets on Clear Lake as well as the Greater Houston and Galveston communities. LYC is a private, member-owned club with great amenities to enjoy with friends and family. Located on 38 beautifully landscaped acres in the NE corner of Clear Lake, it’s an exceptional environment for social and water activities.

Great Results for Texas Sailors at High School Champs

The Texas raised sailors did a great job at the High School Nationals held right here in Galveston Bay.  Here is a “shout out” to four local stars and the amazing new facility, Sea Scout Base Galveston, that hosted the races:

  1. In the Laser Full Rig Division, Max Guerreiro took second place and Ford McCann took third. Awesome!  Results: http://scores.hssailing.org/f16/laserperformance-cressy-full/
  2. In the Laser Radial Division, Charlotte Rose finished third overall (and was the second girl) and Carly Broussard finished 10th(and was the fourth girl).  Awesome!  Results:  http://scores.hssailing.org/f16/laserperformance-cressy-radial/
  3. The championships were held right here in Galveston Bay at the new Sea Scout facilityhttp://ssbgalveston.org/).  It is an amazing facility and many in our community do not know about it, yet (here is a link to high schools already using it: http://ssbgalveston.org/community.php#anchor1).
  4. I recommend visiting this 200+ bed facility it and hope that it hosts many more regattas (Link to view facility: http://ssbgalveston.org/events.php  AND http://ssbgalveston.org/events_contact.php).  There were great views for watching the races… from shore!  The downwind mark was only 20 yards away from the spectators.
  5. College Singlehanded Nationals will be there this coming weekend.  http://2016singlehanded.collegesailing.org

7th Annual JFest Southwest Regatta Results

J/22 (13 boats)
Series Standing – 7 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results last updated: Sunday, October 30, 2016 3:01:11 PM CDT

Pos,Bow/Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. USA 307, Blackburn Marine Racing, Casey Lambert, Lakewood Yacht Club, 3-3-2-4-3-2-1- ; 18
2. 878, Meehem, Tom Meeh, Gbca, 4-2-3-3-4-1-2- ; 19
3. USA 707, Tejas, Terry Flynn, GBCA/ FWBC, 2-1-1-2-1-3-14/RET-BF- ; 24
4. 203, Pressure Drop, Mark Foster, Corpus Christi YC, 4.3/RDG-4-4-5-6-5-6- ; 34.3
5. 365, , Vincent Ruder, None, 6-6-5-1-7-4-7- ; 36
6. 26 / 951, , Dov Kivlovitz, None, 1-8-7-14/RET-AF-2-7-3- ; 42T
7. 1531, Parrot Tales Light, Larry Blankenhagen, Lakewood Yacht Club, 5-5-6-6-8-8-4- ; 42T
8. 919, Three Amigos, Kevin Orff, LYC / GBCA, 8-7-8-8-5-6-10- ; 52
9. 392, Loose Cannon, Rick Duste, GBCA, 9-10-11-11-12-11-5- ; 69
10. 650, Forget Me Not, Nataleigh Perez, Fort Worth Boat Club, 10-14/OCS-9-9-9-9-11- ; 71
11. 8 / 732, Helms a Lee, Caroline Burda, HYC, 7-9-14/DSQ-7-10-14/DNS-14/DNS- ; 75
12. 33 / 449, mule mechanic, Ben Kyzar, LCYC, 12-12-12-10-11-10-9- ; 76
13. 578, Student Driver, Gary Thies, GBCA, 11-11-10-12-13-12-8- ; 77

 

J/24 (17 boats)
Series Standing – 5 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results last updated: Sunday, October 30, 2016 3:20:34 PM CDT

Pos,Bow/Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 06 / 126, GIGGLES, Natalie Harden, AYV, 1-1-1-2-1- ; 6
2. 01 / 3734, Miss Conduct, James Freedman, DCYC, 3-6-2-5-2- ; 18
3. 69 / 2702, After Midnight, Mark Smith, FWBC, 2-3-10-9-3- ; 27T
4. 23 / 1155, Trick Bag, Barry Bailey, none, 7-5-5-3-7- ; 27T
5. 05 / 3358, Chupacabra, John Parker, Austin Yacht Club, 11-2-7-1-11/SCP- ; 32
6. 03 / 267, Team BadMoon, Christopher Holmes, DCYC, 4-19/OCS-3-4-4- ; 34T
7. 42 / 4200, Zero Gravity, Josh Bowens-Rubin, Dillon Yacht Club, 10-8-4-6-6- ; 34T
8. 07 / 2822, Vang Go, Stuart Juengst, Austin Yacht Club, 5-7-6-12-11- ; 41
9. 94 / 267, Navy Blue Faded Lady, Peter Brigaitis, DCYC, 12-9-9-8-5- ; 43
10. 19 / 1903, El Rayo-X, Gary Roesler, GBCA, 14-4-8-11-10- ; 47
11. 16 / 2380, superman, David Broadway, Austin YC, 8-11-12-10-12- ; 53
12. 09 / 3894, Sforzando, Christopher Hammel, AYC, 15-10-11-7-13- ; 56
13. 60 / 1565, Gray Wolf, Tim Johnson, DCYC, 6-14-13-15-9- ; 57
14. 13 / 2160, Stray Dog, Jorge Martin-de-Nicolas, AYC, 9-12-19/DNS-13-14- ; 67
15. 11 / 3757, clairebouyant, graham marshall, none, 13-13-15-14-15- ; 70
16. 77 / 2342, Rodeo Clown, Jason Seibert, R2AK, GBCA, 16-16-14-17-16- ; 79
17. 91 / 53191, WHITNEY, Charlie Daniel, LBYC, 17-15-16-16-17- ; 81

J/70 (9 boats)
Series Standing – 7 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results last updated: Sunday, October 30, 2016 1:43:43 PM CDT

Pos,Bow/Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 181, GB, Chris Lewis, LYC, 1-1-3-1-1-2-2- ; 11
2. 850, Mojito, Forbes Durdin, LYC, 3-2-2-2-7-3-1- ; 20
3. 546, Zounds Hearing, Jay Lutz, Lakewood YC, 2-3-4-3-2-4-6- ; 24
4. 240, Stampede, Bruno Pasquinelli, fwbc, 5-6-1-5-3-1-4- ; 25
5. 51 / 51, Black River Racing, Douglas Strebel, Lakewood, 8-4-8-4-4-5-5- ; 38
6. 242, Jason Bradley, JASON Bradley, Jason Bradley, 4-5-5-8-6-8-8- ; 44
7. 241, , Alfred Poindexter, lakewood yacht club, 9-9-6-6-5-6-7- ; 48
8. 28 / 50, Rogue Warrior, Bruce McDonald, AYC, 6-8-9-7-9-7-3- ; 49
9. 1041, Green Onions, Bill Mcnally, Perry Yacht Club, 7-7-7-9-8-9-9- ; 56

J/105 (10 boats)
Series Standing – 8 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results last updated: Sunday, October 30, 2016 1:42:12 PM CDT

Pos,Bow/Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 378, infinity, Uzi Ozeri, LYC, 4-1-1-3-1-4-1-5- ; 20
2. 393, Aftershock, Scott Spurlin, AYC, 1-2-2-2-8-2-3-1- ; 21
3. 624, Vici, John Barnett, Lakewood YC, 2-7-4-1-4-3-2-2- ; 25
4. 344, Two Feathers, Mark Masur, FWBC, 3-4-5-8-5-5-4-3- ; 37
5. 294, Rumpus, Brad Robbins, LYC, 5-3-3-6-6-9-6-7- ; 45
6. 130, Tomahawk, Nathaniel Kemberling, LYC, 7-5-7-4-2-10-9-4- ; 48
7. 649, Radiance, Bill Lakenmacher, LYC, 8-6-8-7-7-1-7-6- ; 50
8. 124, Blue Flash, Matthew Arno, FWBC, 10-10-6-5-3-8-5-9- ; 56
9. 430, Kinderspel2, John Bell, CCYC, 6-8-9-9-9-7-8-8- ; 64
10. 296, Stinger, J B Bednar, LYC/GBCA, 9-9-10-10-10-6-10-10- ; 74

J/PHRF Spin(Sym) (2 boats)
Series Standing – 7 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results last updated: Sunday, October 30, 2016 1:44:32 PM CDT

Pos,Bow/Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 178, Press to Meco, Ray Bentele, GBCA, 1-1-2-1-1.5/TIE-1-1- ; 8.5
2. 28, Toccata, Gary Trinklein, GBCA, 2-2-1-2-1.5/TIE-2-2- ; 12.5

J/PHRF Spin (Asym) (8 boats)
Series Standing – 8 races scored

Information is provisional and subject to modification
Regatta results last updated: Sunday, October 30, 2016 2:56:51 PM CDT

Pos,Bow/Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. USA74, Second Star, J.D. Hill, LYC, 1-1-1-1-1-1-1-3- ; 10
2. 162, Leading Edge, Tom Sutton, lyc,hyc,gbca, 2-2-3-2-2-2-3-1- ; 17
3. 181, Hamburg, Albrecht Goethe, LYC, 3-3-2-3-3-3-2-2- ; 21
4. 31, Little Joe, Dan Sullivan, Southern Yacht Club, 6-5-4-5-5-4-4-4- ; 37T
5. 238, Airborne, David Christensen, LYC / GBCA, 5-4-5-4-4-5-5-5- ; 37T
6. 45, Harm’s Way, Andy Wescoat, GBCA, 7-6-6-6-7-6-6-7- ; 51
7. 77, 77, George Cushing, GBCA, 8-7-7-7-6-7-7-6- ; 55
8. 1, Second Wind, Chris Waters, Kemah Boardwalk Marina, 4-9/DNF-9/DNS-9/DNS-9/DNS-9/DNC-9/DNC-9/DNC- ; 67

Notes
– Scoring System is RRS Low Point 2013-2016
– Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Information is provisional and subject to modification

Corsair Marine Pulse 600 Trimaran

pulse600 Corsair Marine Pulse 600 Trimaran

Sailboats are either built for comfort or for speed. The new Corsair Marine Pulse 600 Trimaran falls in the latter category. Longtime friends and Galveston Bay sailors Martin Hamilton and Bob Webbon recently purchased a Pulse 600. These guys have been racing catamarans for years so we thought it would be a good idea to ask them what they thought of the boat.

What is your idea of the perfect sailboat?

Martin: In two words stable and fast. For the last decade, I have been sailing a Condor 40 trimaran and an A-Class catamaran. The catamaran provided the opportunity to compete around the country in a single handed fast boat. The trimaran allowed me to entertain on a quick boat with plenty of stability (set a beverage down and come back later and finish it).

Bob: The perfect boat? For what? For sailing? For cruising? For having friends onboard, etc. If it’s a perfect day sailing boat then it must have a groove. It should give back what you put in. It should have a feel that is pleasurable, it should take you away from the mundane of life. It should be exciting. There are plenty of great boats that do that.

What do you like most about this boat?

MH: The Pulse 600 is the new standard. It has the speed and excitement of an A-Cat and at the same time is stable enough for my wife and I to handle even in winds of 20+ knots. And the boat easily accommodates 4 adults. Perfect for a family outing.

BW: The Pulse 600 is light weight so it is lively, responsive but forgiving. It’s quick in a breeze and remains fast with four people on board. It’s just downright fun. Get a little boom box on board with a nice cold beverage, sheets cleated doing high teens, what more do you need for a great afternoon.

What is it that you most dislike about this boat?

MH: Probably the difficulty pinning the mast base onto the pedestal in order to raise mast. Once pinned the mast is easily raised

BW: Yes, it takes a bit more work, but it gives back so much more.

Both of you guys are obsessed with speed, why can’t you cruise along like the rest of us?

MH:  I understand the desire to cruise. It is always easy to ‘throttle back’ and enjoy a beverage and conversation. But, you can enjoy the beverage and conversation even at top speed.

BW: First of all I do have a cruising boat, but I’m just not obsessed with going slow. I can’t think of any other sport where slower is better. I think if more people knew they could set their beverage down on a boat without it spilling and they could actually sail much faster while doing that, they would figure it out.

If you could describe this boat in one word, what would it be?

MH: Friendly

BW: Perfect

These boats are pretty wide, are you having problems finding a slip?

MH: We actually keep the boat on a trailer. The boat can be launched and motored with the wings folded. Bob and I are storing the boat with the wings extended at the Houston Yacht Club and are set up to launch from the crane.

BW: Corsair Tris have been around for decades. Their folding systems are proven, so we can launch via crane, ramp or even wet sailed from a normal slip.

Are you guys still friends, now that you own a boat together?

MH: Bob and I actually owned a Tornado catamaran in the late 80s. We sold it after the Tornado Worlds. We continued spending a lot of time together sailboarding. Eventually in the early 2000s we both purchased A-Cats and have traveled the country together with our multi-boat trailer. Did I mention that it’s always been Bob’s idea?

BW: I’ve been partners on sailboats and power boats. It’s always been great. I think that realization is what’s driving a growing part of the boating industry right now. Look at all the new boat sharing programs and companies. We now even have a community sailing program in Galveston. It just makes sense. There’s just no reason to feel like ownership has to be expensive. Partnerships also bring folks closer together through their shared interests. We’re better friends because of the boats we’ve owned together.

You both grew up sailing on Galveston Bay, what is it about this place that you like most?

MH: It’s such a great sailing area. Lots of water and wind most of the time if you’re willing to wait for the shore breeze.

BW: Wind. Unlike a lot of other sailing venues we seem to have more wind. We also have great racing organizations on the bay.

Near Perfect Weather During the 30th Annual Harvest Moon Regatta

harvestmoon16 Near Perfect Weather During the 30th Annual Harvest Moon Regatta

Harvest Moon racers could be seen off the Galveston beachfront. Photo by Kelly Groce.

harvestmoonlogo Near Perfect Weather During the 30th Annual Harvest Moon RegattaMore than 140 boats took off from Pleasure Pier in Galveston on a beautiful, clear Thursday afternoon and raced down the coast to Port Aransas to complete the 30th Annual Harvest Moon Regatta.® Saturday, Oct. 15 was a busy day as the sailors were treated to a barbecue dinner and awards banquet followed by the Welcome Sailors Rum Party.

Lakewood Yacht Club was well represented among the race winners. John Barnett seized the coveted Bacardi Cup; Ted Greak earned the Cameron Cannon; Charles Herpich won the Commodore/John Broderick Memorial, and Jim Demarest took home the PHRF Spin Overall. Other Lakewood members who achieved top finishes in their divisions include: First Place winners Kevin Tyrrell, Ash Walker, Uzi Ozeri, Bob Giles, and Randy Pike; Second Place winners Carl Drechsel, J.D. Hill, Jay Zittrer, Cran Frasier, Taylor Smith, Gerhard Wittich and Richard Fawcett; Third Place winners Al Goethe, J.D. Bednar, O.J. Young, and Fred Pounds, and Fourth Place winners Robert Crosby and Gregory Way. Visit www.harvestmoonregatta.com for the full results.

This annual race is organized by Bay Access, a charitable organization supporting amateur racing. It is hosted by Lakewood Yacht Club, the City of Port Aransas and Port Aransas & Mustang Island. Aside from Harvest Moon Regatta title sponsor Bacardi U.S.A., other gracious sponsors of the 30th Annual Regatta included the City of Seabrook, all Bay Access annual race sponsors, Banks Sails, Windward Sea Ventures, Alliant Marine & Energy Insurance, Boatpix.com, Mantus Anchors, The Yacht Sales Company, Edna Rice Executive Recruiters, RejeX.com, Optima Marine, Faron Daigle Realtor®, Superior Marine Services, True North Marine, Coast Guard Foundation, Little Yacht Sales, North Canvas and Upholstery, Davis Marine Electronics, Gulf Coast Mariner Magazine, Ocean Navigator, Eagle Maritime Services, Inc. Saved by Spot, The Insurance Navigators, Fishbones Safety Solutions and Energy Services, Triumphus, Laguna Harbor, Oj’s Marine and several others.

“As usual, we could not continue to host this hugely successful event without the support of these enthusiastic sponsors, and this year’s no different,” says Harvest Moon Regatta® Chairman Rex Bettis. “Our sponsors make this an exciting first-class event for our racers, spectators and guests.”

Congratulatulations to all the race winners and thanks go out to the numerous volunteers who helped make this a great event.

If you have questions about the race or have an interest in sponsoring next year’s regatta, visit www.harvestmoonregatta.com.

Don’t Miss the 7th Annual J/Fest Southwest Regatta Skippers’ Meeting

unnamed2 1 Dont Miss the 7th Annual J/Fest Southwest Regatta Skippers MeetingThe 7th Annual J/Fest Southwest Regatta Skipper’s Meeting is scheduled for 7:30 p.m., Friday, October 28 in the Lakewood Yacht Club Ballroom.

“All racers are encouraged to attend,” says 2016 J/Fest Southwest Regatta Chairman Dave Christensen. “You will receive important information and updates about the race and its surrounding activities from an informative agenda of speakers.”

J/Fest Southwest, hosted by Lakewood Yacht Club, will take place in Galveston Bay October 29-30. Entries in this year’s race include J-boats ranging from 22′ to 40′ in length.

Saturday evening, the L.C. Roots band will provide live entertainment and a traditional “Frogmore Stew” shrimp and sausage boil and drink specials will be available on the Lakewood Yacht Club grounds.

The awards ceremony will be held Sunday, October 30 in the Lakewood Ballroom.

Questions about the Skippers’ Meeting or the J/Fest Southwest Regatta should be directed to Dave Christensen at dc1sail@comcast.net. For information about the event or event accommodations, visit www.jfestsouthwest.com.

unnamed 5 Dont Miss the 7th Annual J/Fest Southwest Regatta Skippers Meeting

About Lakewood Yacht Club

Rated among the top 10 yacht clubs in the United States, Lakewood Yacht Club (LYC) is one of the best-kept secrets on Clear Lake as well as the Greater Houston and Galveston communities. LYC is a private, member-owned club with great amenities to enjoy with friends and family. Located on 38 beautifully landscaped acres in the NE corner of Clear Lake, it’s an exceptional environment for social and water activities.

30th Annual Lakewood Yacht Club Harvest Moon Regatta Results

Withdrew Prior to Start (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 1145, Nachtwacht, Thomas Caskey, Lakewood yacht club, 1- ; 1
2. 110, Restless, Robin Rice, WYC, 2- ; 2
3. 183, T-REX, fred soward, none, 3- ; 3
4. 39, Lady Daphne, Douglas Ottens, HYC, 4- ; 4
5. 436, Free Spirit, Jeff Hirsch, GBCA, 5- ; 5

DavisA HrvstMnRgtta 11 30th Annual Lakewood Yacht Club Harvest Moon Regatta Results

Photo by Ashleigh Davis www.wildnwanderlust.org

Multihull (top)

Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: A (6 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 009, Nelda Ray, Peter Pattullo[A], Longview Yacht Club, 5- ; 5
2. 273, Condor, Chris Croninger[A], LCYC, 8- ; 8
3. 51231, Trilobyte, Russ Myers[A], Port Arthur Yacht Club, 9- ; 9
4. 129, Gimme Samoa, John Williams[A], RYC, 11- ; 11
5. 276, Abandoned Assets, Bo Kersey[A], Austin Yacht Club, 13- ; 13
6. 215, Tribology, Doug Casey[A], Austin Yacht Club, 14- ; 14

Division: B (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 64, Flight Simulator, Tom Reese[B], Youngstown Yacht Club, 1- ; 1
2. 40133, Linda O, John King[B], TOMA, 3- ; 3
3. 30, Tritium, Steve Frick[B], Austin Yacht Club, 7- ; 7
4. A32, Josephine, William Pack[B], Island Moorings, 10- ; 10
5. 8, Pachuco, William Loving[B], None, 16- ; 16

Division: C (9 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 002, Chaton Noir, John Scherer[C], Waterford YC, 2- ; 2
2. A394, Brie, Chris Block[C], Austin Yacht Club, 4- ; 4
3. 5855, JEDICCO, Fred Pounds[C], LYC, 6- ; 6
4. 853, Vivace, Scott Weaver[C], Scott Weaver, 12- ; 12
5. 22, CatNap, Richard Wheeler[C], HYC, 15- ; 15
6. A270, Double Vision, Brad Kaylor[C], no, 17- ; 17
7. 44, Folie A Deux, Gary Vaughan[C], Waterford Yacht Club, 18- ; 18
8. A45, Nauti-Cat, Richard Griffin[C], None, 19- ; 19
9. 563, Ellie Jane, Joel Turner[C], Watergate, 21/DNF- ; 21

Cruising Poleless Spinnaker (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: A (6 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 415, Bev ‘n Jo, Charles Herpich[A], Lakewood, 1- ; 1
2. 158, Force Majeure, John Lehman[A], none, 3- ; 3
3. 83, Karma, Alan Moore[A], GBCA, 4- ; 4
4. 40860, Tomfoolery II, Tom Meeh[A], gbca, 7- ; 7
5. 27, Soy Un Gatito JPB, Bob Brindley[A], Bowling Green State University Sailing Team, 8- ; 8
6. 46, Makan Angin, Jill Hughes[A], LYC, 10- ; 10

Division: B (9 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 60184, Moondance, Randy Pike[B], LYC, 2- ; 2
2. 111, Fiddler, Taylor Smith[B], Lakewood, 5- ; 5
3. 319, Back on Tack, Craig Yakel[B], TMCA, 6- ; 6
4. 1326, le Fay, Erik Jansson[B], none, 9- ; 9
5. 99, Orion, David Popken[B], None, 11- ; 11
6. 270, Quiet Flight, Andy LeRoy[B], Waterford YC, 12- ; 12
7. 121, Topaz, Tom Frankum[B], Lakewood Yacht Club, 13- ; 13
8. A28, Rodeless Traveler, Paul Britton[B], Sail Ventures USA, 14- ; 14
9. h31, Sunshine, Michael Sylvers[B], Watergate, 15- ; 15

Cruising Non-Spin (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: M (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 455, EDELWEISS, Ted Greak[M], LYC, 1- ; 1
2. 380, Resolute, chris parrish[M], TMCA, 6- ; 6
3. 91699, Docket, Eric Lipper[M], Seabrook, 10- ; 10
4. 168, Osprey, Walter Barnett[M], GBCA, 11- ; 11
5. 102, Escapade, Lonny Doss[M], Lake Charles Yacht Club, 13- ; 13

Division: N (4 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 60187, Sea Nymph, Joan van Ravenswaay[N], Houston Yacht Club, 2- ; 2
2. 42, Paradise, Andrew Bahr[N], Lake worth Sailing Club, 3- ; 3
3. 174, No Le Hace, Aaron Gladish[N], None, 7- ; 7
4. 50, Attitude of Gratitude, Larry Lawyer[N], Lakewood, 14- ; 14

Division: O (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 14641, Bianca, Marc Bruderer[O], none, 4- ; 4
2. 110, Renegade, Bill Hoffman[O], TMCA, 5- ; 5
3. 101, Athena, John Swanson[O], GBCA, 8- ; 8
4. H41, Surface Interval, Craig Gaines[O], Portofino Harbour, 9- ; 9
5. A31, Nora Marie, Stephen Caughron[O], Harborwalk, 12- ; 12

Cruising Non-Spin Classic Canvas (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: E (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 35, Tropical Impulse, Kevin Tyrrell[E], LYC, 2- ; 2
2. 31456, Ibis, Thomas Goldsbury[E], GBCA, 5- ; 5
3. 306, Josephine, Joe Powers[E], HYC, 28- ; 28
4. 53, Barefoot Shoes, James Coe[E], TMCA, 29- ; 29
5. 1, Nauti Girl, Shannon Hicks[E], Watergate, 38- ; 38

Division: F (8 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 21335, Firewater, Walter Horton[F], GBCA, 3- ; 3
2. 41749, SSTV Gremlin, Rob Freas[F], Sea Scouts, BSA / LYC, 4- ; 4
3. 466, Relentless, Lucy Newman[F], South Coast Sailing Club, 11- ; 11
4. 655, Royal Crescent, Robert Crosby[F], LYC, 13- ; 13
5. 53, Astarte, Cheryl Morvillo[F], TASS, 14- ; 14
6. 760, Island Time, Jimmy Jones[F], PHYC, TMCA, 21- ; 21
7. 16, Rapide, Don Pearson[F], Waterford Harbor, 26- ; 26
8. 044, Wine Knot, Robert Best[F], LYC, 37- ; 37

Division: G (4 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. M45, Tropic Breeze, John E. Jones[G], Blue Dolphin, 1- ; 1
2. 432, Knot Guilty, Robert Scardino[G], Waterford Yacht Club, 12- ; 12
3. 777A, Mary Jane, Mike Wilkinson[G], LYC, 30- ; 30
4. A40, Carioca, Evan Macaluso[G], Sail Ventures USA, 31- ; 31

Division: H+B%26R (6 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 45, DagEli, Dag Calafell II[H B&R], Waterford YC, 6- ; 6
2. 19A, The Gail Mary, Daniel Knierien[H B&R], Optima Marine, 9- ; 9
3. 3600, Moonlight Serenade, Charles Sharp[H B&R], None, 15- ; 15
4. 38109, Wandering Star, Thomas Sherrill Jr[H B&R], GBCA, TMCA, PHYC, 24- ; 24
5. 427, Ketchup, mike baker[H B&R], watergate, 27- ; 27
6. 162, Tara Shell, David Cathcart[H B&R], WYH, 34- ; 34

Division: I (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. A36, Shell Seaker, David Glascock[I], HYC, TMCA, GBCA, 8- ; 8
2. 133, Stellar of Course, Ronald Eddleman[I], GBCA, TMCA, 17- ; 17
3. 52846, Susanne B, D Slack[I], Houston Yacht Club, 19- ; 19
4. 165, Mischief, Nancy Welch[I], TMCA, TASS, GBCA, 25- ; 25
5. 243, Two J Birds, R Michael Glass[I], None, 36- ; 36

Division: J (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 125, Point of Beginning, Doug Catenaci[J], Waterford Yacht Club, 16- ; 16
2. 828, Sanctuary, Mike Tyson II[J], HYC, 20- ; 20
3. 3371, Sea Gypsy, Bill Jenko[J], GBCA/TMCA, 22- ; 22
4. 55, Gemini, James Hammond[J], United States Power Squadrons, 32- ; 32
5. 208A, Lady Melinda, Terry Hollar[J], South Shore, 33- ; 33

Division: L (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 1945, Gypsy Soul, William King[L], Island Moorings, 7- ; 7
2. 376, Moonlighter, Travis Smith[L], Brazosport Yacht Club, 10- ; 10
3. 472, Breezing Up, William Howze[L], Nonsuch, 18- ; 18
4. 84, Dram Buoy, Peter Larabee[L], Waterford Yacht Club, 23- ; 23
5. 37, Blanca Luna, Mark Zimmerman[L], None, 35- ; 35

Cruising Non-Spin Cutter (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: D (7 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 24, Cimboco, Phil Pierce[D], None, 1- ; 1
2. 86, Company, Dave Miller[D], SYC, 2- ; 2
3. 41, Homers’ Odyssey, Jason Anderson[D], None, 3- ; 3
4. 302, windship, GARY WATKINS[D], none, 4- ; 4
5. A44, No Wahalla, John Bartges[D], Waterford, 5- ; 5
6. A34, Stardust, E Wayne Alderman[D], GBCA Watergate, 6- ; 6
7. 045, Texas Gypsea, Arthur Boos[D], GBCA, 8/DNF- ; 8

Cruising Non-Spin Ketch (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: K (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 17, Patriot, Carl Drechsel[K], LYC, 1- ; 1
2. 1068, Liberty, David Gohlke[K], none, 2- ; 2
3. 144, Morning Star, John Gross[K], HYC, 3- ; 3
4. Y50, Mermaid III, William Young[K], Seabrook Shipyard, 4- ; 4
5. 2, Salsa 2, Loren Cadenhead[K], Galveston Community Sailing, 5- ; 5

Cruising PHRF Non-Spin (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: A (4 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 334, Cache’, Robert Giles[A], LYC, 2- ; 2
2. 32, Moonlight Shadow, Richard Fawcett[A], LYC, 5- ; 5
3. 51338, Musica, Kylie Schischka[A], B Sailing, 8- ; 8
4. A46, Estuary One, Elliott Bouillion[A], none, 9- ; 9

Division: B (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 17, GOOD NEWS, Ashley Walker[B], LYC, 1- ; 1
2. 001, Other Woman, Brantly Minor[B], GBCA, 3- ; 3
3. US 1237, felicity, gerald lawrie[B], TCYC, 4- ; 4
4. 1152, SEUTE DEERN, Hans Knickrehm[B], LYC, 6- ; 6
5. 312, Esperanza II, PAUL MAGNINI[B], BYC, 7- ; 7

PHRF Spin (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: A (6 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. A122, Easy Does It, Uzi Ozeri[A], LYC, 3- ; 3
2. 45, Figaro, Gerhard Wittich[A], LYC, 4- ; 4
3. 77932, LickitySplit, Corey Harding[A], BYC, 5- ; 5
4. 007, Parrot Tales, Larry Blankenhagen[A], Lakewood Yacht Club, 6- ; 6
5. 202, Concussion, Jason Seibert[A], R2AK, GBCA, 9- ; 9
6. 7288, Encore, Sawnie McEntire[A], Watergate Marina, 12/DNF- ; 12

Division: B (5 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 52, Sodalis, Jim Demarest[B], LYC, 1- ; 1
2. 11899, BANJO GIRL, jay zittrer[B], Lakewood Yacht Club, 2- ; 2
3. 40645, Texas Ranger II, Chuck Wielchowsky[B], HYC / GBCA, 7- ; 7
4. 42570, Phoenix, David Atkinson[B], HYC/GBCA, 8- ; 8
5. 584, Big D, Jim Foster[B], GBCA, 12/DNF- ; 12

ORC Club Spinnaker Bacardi Fleet (top)
Series Standing – 1 race scored

Division: A (8 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 12039, AEOLUS, James Liston[A], Houston YC, GBCA, 2- ; 2
2. 51709, Hamburg II, Albrecht Goethe[A], LYC, 4- ; 4
3. USA74, Second Star, J.D. Hill[A], LYC, 6- ; 6
4. 75, Gold Rush, Gregory Way[A], LYC, 13- ; 13
5. 35008, Deja Vu, Jeff Kitterman[A], GBCA, 15- ; 15
6. 45, Harm’s Way, Andy Wescoat[A], GBCA, 17- ; 17
7. 46864, Joyride, Greg A Casamayor[A], GBCA, 18- ; 18
8. 32111, Passion, Steve Hastings[A], CCYC, 19- ; 19

Division: B (7 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 624, Vici, John Barnett[B], Lakewood YC, 1- ; 1
2. 23, Veloce, Josh Richline[B], Corpus Christi Yacht Club, 3- ; 3
3. 296, Stinger, J B Bednar[B], LYC/GBCA, 5- ; 5
4. 430, Kinderspel2, John Bell[B], CCYC, 7- ; 7
5. 93270, Señor Moment, Jeffrey Progelhof[B], RCYC/HYC, 10- ; 10
6. 158, Stampede, Mark Gardner[B], grand lake sailing club, 20- ; 20
7. 46, Barbarella, Jim Blakewell[B], Oklahoma City Boat Club, 21- ; 21

Division: C (6 boats) Pos,Sail, Boat, Skipper, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 398, Flyer, Ben Miller[C], GBAC, 8- ; 8
2. 40306, WHISTLER II, John Fraser[C], Lakewood Yacht Club, 9- ; 9
3. 135, Happy Ending, O.J. Young[C], LYC, 11- ; 11
4. 10312, Danelaw, Roy Olsen[C], GBCA, 12- ; 12
5. 53, SolAire, Chris Haas[C], GBCA, 14- ; 14
6. 307, Good Leif, Hedda Kukla[C], BDYC, 16- ; 16

Notes
– Scoring System is RRS Low Point 2013-2016
– Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Information is provisional and subject to modification

2016 Laser Gulf Coast Championship Results

Laser 4.7 (7 boats) (top)
Series Standing – 8 races scored

Pos,Sail, Skipper, Division, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 205399, LUCIJA RUZEVIC, [Junior][F], DCYC/P1, [3]-2-3-1-3-1-2-2- ; 14
2. 186510, MICHAEL MORSE, [Junior], Lakewood Yacht Club, 1-1-2-[6]-6-2-1-4- ; 17
3. 20410, Matthew Morrell, [Junior], Lakewood Yacht Club, [6]-3-1-4-2-4-3-5- ; 22
4. 169816, Ethan Froelich, [Junior], Austin Yacht Club, 2-4-5-[7]-4-3-5-1- ; 24
5. 206098, Jacob Granberry, [Junior], CCYC, 5-5-4-5-1-[8/OCS]-6-3- ; 29
6. 165422, AnaClare Sole, [Junior][F], Texas Corinthian Yacht Club, 4-6-[7]-3-5-5-4-6- ; 33
7. 1, Sara Boyd, [Junior][F], Fairhope Yacht Club, [7]-7-6-2-7-6-7-7- ; 42

 

Laser Radial (27 boats) (top)
Series Standing – 8 races scored

Pos,Sail, Skipper, Division, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 207144, Chase Carraway, [Junior], Lauderdale Yacht Club/ CYC-NC, [7]-1-3-1-3-2-1-1- ; 12
2. 210460, Gage Wilson, [Open], LYC, 1-2-1-3-1-7-2-[28/DSQ]- ; 17
3. 196848, Charlotte Rose, [Junior][F], Houston Yacht Club/ GCYSA, 2-3-2-2-2-6-3-[9]- ; 20
4. 204109, Ricky Welch, [Junior], Long Beach Yacht Club, 3-4-5-4-6-5-5-[10]- ; 32
5. 208059, Caden Scheiblauer, [Junior], Santa Barbara YC | SBYSF | GCYSA, 6-7-6-[28/OCS]-4-13-6-5- ; 47
6. 197044, Carly Broussard, [Open][F], LYC, 9-[16]-4-10-5-4-4-13- ; 49
7. 204438, Marc Andrew Robin, [Junior], RStLYC, [19]-5-9-9-11-11-13-6- ; 64
8. 201251, Conrad Vandlik, [Open], MYC, 5-[19]-8-8-9-8-11-16- ; 65
9. 203630, Sophia Sole, [Open][F], Texas Corinthian Yacht Club, 14-12-10-7-10-1-[16]-14- ; 68
10. 206615, Brandon Cassard, [Junior], GCYSA, 13-15-[19]-6-16-9-10-3- ; 72
11. 204111, Alexander Hankins, [Junior], GCYSA /LYC, 10-10-7-13-7-19-7-[21]- ; 73
12. AHO 205411, Tijn van der Gulik, [Junior], YSCO – Asiento, [17]-6-11-5-8-16-17-12- ; 75
13. 191997, Luke welker, [Open], Lauderdale YC, 4-14-15-14-14-[17]-8-7- ; 76
14. 204103, Tomas Samitier, [Open], Seabrook Sailing Club, 16-13-14-12-[28/DNS]-3-14-8- ; 80
15. 206098, Spencer LeGrande, [Open], GCYSA, 11-17-12-11-12-15-9-[18]- ; 87
16. 211535, Bryan Trammell, [Junior], TCYC/GCYSA, 12-[20]-16-16-13-12-15-4- ; 88
17. 204106, Peter Vaseliades, [Junior], CCYC, 15-11-18-17-17-10-[20]-2- ; 90
18. 209727, Kiera O’Reardon, [Junior][F], GCYSA / Houston Yacht Club, 8-9-13-15-18-14-18-[28/OCS]- ; 95
19. 208098, Colin Dorsey, [Junior], LYC/CGSC, [22]-8-17-18-15-20-12-20- ; 110
20. 171186, Benjamin Froelich, [Open], Austin Yacht Club, 18-21-20-20-19-[23]-19-11- ; 128
21. 208108, Daniel Tindall, [Junior], CCYC, [25]-18-21-24-22-24-23-17- ; 149
22. 208569, Camille McGriff, [Junior][F], Fairhope Yacht Club, 20-23-23-23-20-18-[24]-24- ; 151
23. 153272, Andrew Butler, [Open], Austin Yacht Club, 21-[26]-24-22-23-21-21-22- ; 154
24. 158824, Nick Dunphey, [Junior], Lakewood Yacht Club, 24-24-22-19-21-[26]-25-23- ; 158
25. 178918, Jacob Warner, [Junior], Lakewood Yacht Club, 23-22-[25]-25-24-25-22-19- ; 160
26. 197593, Tyler Kemberling, [Junior], Lakewood, 26-25-26-21-26-22-[27]-15- ; 161
27. 181139, Nicolas Svec, [Junior], LYC, 27-27-[28/RET-BF]-26-25-27-26-25- ; 183  

Laser (28 boats) (top)
Series Standing – 7 races scored

Pos,Sail, Skipper, Division, Yacht Club, Results, Total Points
1. 206050, Chase Burwell, [Junior], Lauderdale Yacht Club – Carlouel, 2-3-2-1-1-[4]-1- ; 10T
2. 194070, Skylar Bayman, [Junior], Houston Yacht Club, 1-2-1-2-2-2-[4]- ; 10T
3. 156548, Dustin Brennan, [Open], Southern Yacht Club, 8-5-[9]-4-3-3-2- ; 25
4. 170989, Raleigh Christman, [Open], Seabrook Sailing Club, 3-6-7-[8]-4-1-5- ; 26
5. 191910, Ryan Minth, [Master], C-vane, [14]-1-3-5-10-12-3- ; 34
6. 199760, David Morgan, [Grand Master], Seabrook Sailing Club, [16]-4-4-13-7-6-6- ; 40
7. 208567, Peter McGriff, [Junior], Fairhope Yacht Club, 4-8-10-3-[11]-9-11- ; 45
8. 191086, Dominic Van der Walt, [Open], Houston Yacht Club, [21]-14-11-6-5-7-13- ; 56
9. 181864, Marten Kendrick, [Open], Houston Yacht Club, [20]-15-8-7-6-18-7- ; 61
10. 185837, Charles White, [Grand Master], SSC, 11-10-[15]-10-12-13-8- ; 64
11. 187956, Alexander Goldberg, [Open], Corinthian Sailing Club, 6-18-6-12-9-15-[19]- ; 66
12. 206110, Lance Kim, [Apprentice Master], Birmingham Sailing Club, [19]-13-5-15-8-19-10- ; 70T
13. 208379, Ty Geiger, [Grand Master], Seabrook Sailing Club, 15-7-12-14-13-[20]-9- ; 70T
14. 190275, Griffin Orr, [Open], Corinthian Sailing Club, 5-[19]-17-9-18-14-14- ; 77
15. 10055, Ian Hunter, [Junior], Fort Walton Yacht Club, 9-17-13-16-[23]-10-18- ; 83
16. 157833, Forest Atkins, [Grand Master], Corinthian SC Dallas, [27]-9-14-17-14-21-12- ; 87T
17. 160049, Deon Van der Walt, [Master], Houston Yacht Club, 10-12-16-18-15-16-[20]- ; 87T
18. 171593, Josh Rubin, [Grand Master], CLSC, 23-16-20-11-16-5-[29/OCS]- ; 91
19. 206099, Ian McKeige, [Open], Houston Yacht Club, 12-[22]-18-20-19-11-16- ; 96
20. 176241, Pablo Freire, [Open], Seabrook Sailing Club, 18-23-19-[25]-21-8-15- ; 104
21. 164245, Sebastien DUBOIS, [Apprentice Master], Seabrook sailing Club, 7-20-21-23-17-25-[29/DNF]- ; 113T
22. 209728, Jody Smith, [Grand Master], Corinthian Sailing Club, 17-11-[29/OCS]-22-20-22-21- ; 113T
23. 174254, Tim Ponter, [Open], Corinthian Sailing Club, [25]-24-25-24-22-17-17- ; 129
24. 149083, Greg Wallace, [Master], CSC, 13-25-23-21-24-24-[29/RET]- ; 130
25. 174300, John Oliver, [Grand Master], CSC, 24-26-22-19-25-26-[29/DNF]- ; 142
26. 204104, BRIAN HANNAN, [Open], CSC, 26-[27]-26-26-26-23-22- ; 149
27. 182721, Mike Lorenz, [Grand Master], None, 22-21-24-[29/DNS]-29/DNS-29/DNS-29/DNS- ; 154
28. 20315, Fred Schroth, [Grand Master], Austin Yacht Club, [29/DNS]-29/DNS-29/DNS-29/DNS-29/DNS-29/DNS-29/DNS- ; 174

Notes
– Scoring System is RRS Low Point 2013-2016
– Finishes in [brackets] denote throwouts

Information is provisional and subject to modification

The Houston Yacht Club Ladies Association Presents Holiday Market on the Bay

2014 ladies banner The Houston Yacht Club Ladies Association Presents Holiday Market on the Bay

The Houston Yacht Club Ladies Association

The Houston Yacht Club Ladies Association will hold a Holiday Market on the Bay Tuesday evening, Nov. 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. and again on Wednesday, Nov. 2 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Houston Yacht Club is located at 3620 Miramar Drive in Shoreacres.  The event is open to the public and admission and parking are both free.  There will be a buffet lunch available for $15 per person.

Bring your friends and family to enjoy the festive atmosphere and get your Christmas shopping done early. The annual Holiday Market on the Bay is the best way to kick-off the holiday season, spend time with friends and find some unique treasures.

More than 40 vendors are participating in this annual Holiday Market on the Bay.

Some of the items available to purchase include Holiday items, baked goods, jewelry, clothing and more. Please visit us online at www.houstonyachtclub.com for a map with directions.